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Amelia Goranson

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Amelia Goranson

Assistant Visiting Professor of Psychology

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401

309-341-7108

algoranson@​knox.edu

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Ford Center for the Fine Arts

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

General Interests 

"The questions that interest me most are at the intersection of moral psychology and health. What are the causes and consequences of the way that we think about our doctors’ abilities and personal attributes? Why are some diseases moralized and others aren’t? My research examines these types of questions through the lens of “mind perception,” or the mental capacities and traits that we assign to others. Since we can never truly know the contents of another person’s mind, our judgments of and interactions with other people are based on our “best guess” perception of what their mind contains. While we’re often accurate in our mind perceptions, we make errors, too. In fact, some of the most interesting findings about moral judgments are in the cases where our mind perceptions are not accurate. For example, recent work of mine shows that Americans tend to perceive doctors’ minds as extremely competent and capable—to the extent that they think of them as almost superhuman or godlike. At the same time, burnout among doctors is a huge challenge in the medical community, suggesting that doctors need more recognition of their human needs."

Years at Knox: 2020 to present

Education

Ph.D., Social Psychology, 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

B.A., Psychology, 2014, Knox College

Teaching Interests

Social psychology, morality, mind perception

Selected Professional Accomplishments

Honors/Grants

UNC Dashiell Graduate Student Travel Award, 2019
Teaching Commendation, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, 2018
UNC Dashiell Graduate Student Travel Award, 2018
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, 2016-2019
SPSP Graduate Student Travel Award, 2018
UNC Dashiell Graduate Student Travel Award, 2017
Graduate Student Transportation Grant , 2017
Dashiell Research Travel Award, 2016
Robert Stevens Harper Prize for Graduate Study in Psychology, 2014
Richter Memorial Trust Research Grant, 2013
Human Behavior & Evolution Society Student Grant, 2013
Ford (ASSET) Fellowship, Knox College, 2013-2014
Lazlo J. Nemeth Memorial Research Scholarship Award, 2013
Richter Memorial Trust Travel Grant, 2013
Roger’s Memorial Hospital Medical Staff Scholarship, 2011
Hanger Orthopedic Group Scholarship, 2010
Lincoln Scholarship, Knox College, 2010-2014

Publications

Goranson, A., Sheeran, P., Katz, J.* & Gray, K. (in press). Mind perception in medicine: Doctors are seen as Gods. Social Science & Medicine.

Goranson, A., Ritter, R.S., Waytz, A. Norton, M.I., & Gray, K. (2017). Dying is unexpectedly positive. Psychological Science.

Goranson, A. & Gray, K. (2016). Moral transformation: The paths to heroism, villainy, and victimhood. Handbook of Heroism and Heroic Leadership.

Schein, C., Goranson, A., & Gray, K. (2015). The uncensored truth about morality: Ubiquitous harm and our dyadic moral minds. The Psychologist.

Presentations

Goranson, A., Sheeran, P, Katz, J.D.*, & Gray, K. (2020, March). Mind perception in medicine: Doctors are seen as Gods. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology; New Orleans, LA. 

Goranson, A., Sheeran, P, Katz, J.D.*, & Gray, K. (symposium chair, 2019, May). Mind perception in medicine: Doctors are seen as Gods. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science; Washington, D.C.

Goranson, A., Sheeran, P, Katz, J.D.*, & Gray, K. (2019, April). Doctors as Gods? Superhumanization in the medical context. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Carolina Research in Social and Personality Psychology conference; Durham, NC.

Goranson, A., Ritter, R.S., Waytz, A., Norton, M.I., & Gray, K. (2018, May). Still happy when time runs out: Dying is unexpectedly positive. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science; San Francisco, CA.

Goranson, A., Ritter, R.S., Waytz, A., Norton, M.I., & Gray, K. (2017, October). Losing our most valuable possession: The unexpected positivity of dying. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Consumer Research; San Diego, CA.

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http://www.knox.edu/academics/majors-and-minors/psychology/faculty/goranson-amelia

Printed on Saturday, October 24, 2020