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Majors & Minors > Neuroscience

Faculty

Contact

Esther Penick

Assistant Professor of Biology; Chair of Neuroscience

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7431

epenick@​knox.edu

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Meet the Neuroscience Faculty

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7431

epenick@knox.edu

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

jthorn@knox.edu

Judith Thorn's general interests include signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, cell movements, development, dog behavior and training, and animal assisted therapy.

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7267

hhoffman@knox.edu

"I am doing work on human sexual psychophysiology. I am interested in the origins of patterns of sexual attraction and sexual arousal, in other words what turns people on and why. Most recently I have been looking at the role of learning processes and alcohol use as triggers for sexual compulsivity and sexual risk taking. I also have an animal lab that is set up to look at the neurochemical correlates of behavior. My original interest had been in developmental differences in learning in rats and the role of monoamine and neuropeptide transmitters in such ontogenetic differences. Students in this lab also work on a broader range of projects, examining how various drugs affect behavior, many focusing on drugs of abuse. Both of these areas of research involve inter- and intra- departmental cooperation, i.e., I have worked with other psychology and neuroscience faculty and students from the biology, biochemistry, and the chemistry departments."

Cooperating Faculty from Other Programs

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7748

jdooley@knox.edu

"There are two main threads in my research and they're quite different. Because I spent nearly 20 years in the computer industry, I'm very interested in software development and in the development process. I'm particularly interested in development with small teams of programmers. I think that most really good software gets written in small teams, so that's where I like to look for improvements. The second thread is cryptology, the study of codes and ciphers. I'm particularly interested in how computers and cryptology came together. Currently I've got two projects going, one examining the relationship between Herbert Yardley and William Friedman, America's two founding fathers of cryptology, and the second taking a closer look at Alan Turing's (the godfather of the modern computer) work for the British cipher bureau during World War II."

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7308

jkirkley@knox.edu

"My research program is devoted to investigating factors that control the size and character of the immune response. This basic information about how cells of the immune system respond to various stimuli has a wide variety of applications, ranging from disease prevention to disease amelioration or cure."

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7086

jmountjo@knox.edu

Mountjoy's general interests include the function of song repertoires in Yellow-throated Vireos, including field work in Costa Rica on song variation in woodcreepers and song-sharing in White-breasted Wood-Wrens; comparative analyses of song repertoires in varied avian taxa; function of song repertoires and extended song learning in Red-eyed Vireos; comparative analyses of the evolution of song repertoire size in the genus Vireo.

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7539

jtemplet@knox.edu

"My research takes an interdisciplinary approach, spanning the fields of behavioral ecology, ornithology, experimental and comparative psychology, and neuroethology. The focus of my studies is on learning, memory, and foraging behavior, and involves experimental work in the field and lab. In particular, I am interested in the ecological and cognitive factors that have influenced the evolution of decision-making processes, information use, and learning in solitary and group-living species. I am the campus co-advisor for the ACM Tanzania program, which I co-directed with Jim Mountjoy in 2005."

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https://www.knox.edu/academics/majors-and-minors/neuroscience/faculty

Printed on Wednesday, September 02, 2015

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