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Students rehearse a skit about mustaches they wrote for a class exercise in German.

Courses

Department Chair

Todd Heidt

Associate Professor in Modern Languages-German

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7416

theidt@​knox.edu

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Ford Center for the Fine Arts

GERM 101 , GERM 102, GERM 103 Elementary German

Development of basic communication skills in German (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in order to discuss a variety of topics that relate to everyday life. Students interpret, discuss, and reflect upon many authentic readings, videos, films, and music that reveal the diverse cultural products, perspectives, and practices from the German-speaking world. Open to beginners, and placement by examination. Prerequisite(s): must follow sequence or permission of the instructor; GERM 103 is SL; T. Heidt; staff

GERM 201 Intermediate German

Broad analysis of German-speaking cultural products, practices and perspectives supported by fiction and non-fiction readings, films, online videos and more. Topics include recent history, current events, traditions and contemporary German-speaking cultures. Students further develop the ability to understand and communicate new knowledge in German on a variety of topics and from a variety of perspectives. Prerequisite(s): GERM 103 or equivalent; SL; T. Heidt; staff

GERM 201Q Intermediate Quick-Start German (1/2)

Taught in conjunction with GERM 201, the course stresses the grammar and vocabulary necessary to discuss with Germans in Germany topics ranging from everyday life to past and current politics and culture. Over December Break, students stay with families and attend classes at the Gymnasien, or high schools. Further assignments are developed and overseen by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): GERM 103 or equivalent or permission of the instructor; An additional program fee covers the December Break portion of the course; Staff

GERM 210 Conversation and Composition

Training in speaking and writing idiomatic German through exploration of fiction and non-fiction readings, films, online videos and more. Also includes selective grammar review on the intermediate level. Students will write and present orally on a number of topics and in a number of genres of communication on German-speaking cultures. Prerequisite(s): GERM 201 or equivalent; O; T. Heidt; staff

GERM 235 Introduction to German Literature

Training in speaking and writing idiomatic German through exploration of fiction and non-fiction readings, films, online videos and morematerials from German language newspapers, contemporary literature, and film. Also includes selective grammar review on the intermediate level. Students will write and present orally on a number of topics and in a number of genres of communication on German-speaking cultures. HUM; Prerequisite(s): GERM 201 or equivalent; IC; T. Heidt

GERM 248 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff

GERM 295 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of German not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

GERM 302 , GERM 302E Realism in the German Context

(In German or English) The realist tradition in German literature and film from the 19th century to the present. Students are presented with an overview of what German writers and filmmakers have viewed as 'life as it really is' and how they have chosen to represent 'reality' over the past 150 years. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or equivalent for GERM 302; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 302E; T. Heidt

GERM 317 Goethe

Reading and discussion of Goethe's major works, including selections from his lyric poetry. Class discussions in German. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or equivalent; Staff

GERM 320 Advanced Conversation and Composition

Training in speaking and writing idiomatic German through exploration of materials from German language fiction and non-fiction readings, films, online videos and more. Also includes selective grammar review at the advanced level, and intensive practice in conversation and composition. Students will improve the skills they need to analyze cultural products, practices and perspectives. Prerequisite(s): GERM 210 or equivalent; W; T. Heidt

GERM 324 , GERM 324E 19th Century German Culture

(In German or English) Course topics are the political and ideological consolidation of a German nation in the nineteenth century; intersections of the construct of nation with Germany's imaginary others; challenges posed to national identity by social, political, and intellectual developments. We discuss philosophy, literature, art, and music/opera in their social and political contexts. Thematic aspects of the course typically include: industrialization, urbanization, antisemitism, the culture/civilization distinction, class struggle, changing perceptions of the human subject. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or equivalent or permission of instructor for GERM 324; sophomore standing or permission of instructor for GERM 324E; GERM 324E cross-listed with HIST 324; T. Heidt

GERM 324E Nineteenth Century German Culture

Course topics are the political and ideological consolidation of a German nation in the nineteenth century; intersections of the construct of nation with Germany's imaginary others; challenges posed to national identity by social, political, and intellectual developments. We discuss philosophy, literature, art, and music/opera in their social and political contexts. Thematic aspects of the course typically include: industrialization, urbanization, antisemitism, the culture/civilization distinction, class struggle, changing perceptions of the human subject. Staff

GERM 325 , GERM 325E German Culture: Focus on Berlin

(In German or English) Exploration of contemporary German culture through focus on the nation's once and future capital. This is not a cultural history course but is instead designed to give students insight into the people and concerns "behind the headlines." Course materials include both fiction and non-fiction (political and economic) readings, interviews, slides, film, video and music. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 for GERM 325; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 325E; GERM 325E satisfies HUM Foundations; T. Heidt

GERM 326 , GERM 326E 1920's Berlin: Fears/Fantasies

(In German or English) Introduction to the society, culture, and politics of the Weimar Republic 1919-1933) with particular focus on Berlin. We investigate the literature, visual culture (including film), and political and philosophical writing of that period to acquaint ourselves with major themes of modernity that are still virulent today. The course content may include, but is not limited to, the political, social, and psychological impact of WWI; new technologies (radio, film); mass society and the city; the "New Woman"; the gay liberation movement; theatre, film, and cabaret; the rise of fascism. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or equivalent or permission of instructor for GERM 326; sophomore standing or permission of instructor for GERM 326E; GERM 326E cross-listed with HIST 326; T. Heidt

GERM 328 Twentieth Century German Theater

German plays and theatrical techniques from the 1890s to the present, including naturalism, expressionism, epic theater, and documentary theater. Representative works from Hauptmann, Kaiser, Brecht, Frisch, Durrenmatt, Heiner Muller, Borchert, and others. Students participate in the production of one play in German. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or equivalent; N. Blackadder

GERM 330 or GERM 330E Afro-German Culture

This course will explore the history and culture of the African diaspora in Central Europe. For centuries, there has been a black population in German-speaking Europe, but only in the 1980s did that population begin to think of themselves as Afro-Germans or Black Germans. This class will explore the relationship between race, nationality and history in this context. This class may include topics such as the history of German colonialism, key Afro-German writers and filmmakers, Afro-Germans in the Nazi era and/or communist East Germany, the portrayal of black people in Europe and/or Africa in German-speaking cultures and more. Prerequisite(s): GERM 210 for GERM 330; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 330E; Cross Listing: AFST 330;GERM 330E; T. Heidt

GERM 331 , GERM 331E German Fairy Tales in Context

In this course, students study the advent of the fairy tale genre in the context of the German literary tradition and against the background of the changing national consciousness of Germany around 1800. By analyzing the fairy tale, students will also address German cultural identities and values, ideas of nation building, and didacticism. We will also trace the appropriation and subversion of the fairy tale in later eras and the present. Other topics in this course might include: additional theoretical frameworks (i.e. feminism in fairy tales); queer identities; adolescent development; religion (i.e.: Christianity/paganism); and linguistic projects. Prerequisite(s): For 331: GERM 235 or instructor approval. For 331E: one other course in the English department, sophomore standing, or instructor approval; T. Heidt

GERM 332 or GERM 332E Gender Studies in German Literature and Culture

(In German or English) How is gender constructed in the intellectual and literary history of German-speaking countries, and what are the interrelations between gender construction and the life of cultural or political institutions? Possible course topics include: literature as a gendered institution; sexuality and the state; education; gay/lesbian literature; gender and race. HUM; Prerequisite(s): GERM 210 for GERM 332; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 332E; DV; IC, PI; GERM 332E is cross listed with GWST 332, and satisfies HUM Foundations;; T. Heidt

GERM 334 , GERM 334E Politics and Literature

(In German or English) The course situates literary texts in their specific historical and political contexts, and confronts the philosophical and conceptual problems that arise at the intersection of literature and politics. This dual (historical and philosophical) perspective requires a combination of readings in history, literature, and philosophy/criticism. Topics include: literature and the formation of the public sphere; political agendas and aesthetic autonomy; economics and literature; writers in exile; censorship; revolution and literature. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or GERM 210 for GERM 334; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 334E; GERM 334E satisfies HUM Foundations; T. Heidt

GERM 335 Contemporary Europe, Migration and Refugees

In this course, students primarily explore the post-WWII European history, culture, and politics in the face of mass migration, refugee crises, displacement, and increasing nationalism and racism as they are transferred and shown in literature. Students first examine the historical contexts of migration and refugee crises to gain perspective for the later texts. An initial focus is on the literary representations of immigrants and refugees in different genres both by European and non-European authors. There is also a focus on the cinematic representations of immigrants and refugees both in documentary and feature films. Prerequisite(s): For GERM 335: GERM 210; For English-language sections, sophomore standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: GERM 335E;IS 335;MODL 335; N. Ucar; T. Heidt; staff

GERM 336 , GERM 336E Contemporary German Culture

(In German or English) The course examines contemporary German society and culture in an historical context. Topics include the political legacies of Nazism, East German communism, and the Student Movement of 1968; the role of religion in public life; Germany in a united Europe; immigration and changing concepts of German-ness; changing attitudes towards family, gender, and sexuality. Materials include scholarly essays, fiction, and film. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or 210 for GERM 336; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor for GERM 336E; Cross Listing: HIST 336; W; GERM 336E cross-listed with HIST 336; T. Heidt

GERM 337 , GERM 337E German Society and Film

(In German or English) Survey and analyses of German films within their social, political, and intellectual contexts. The course may present a broad survey from 1919 to the present, focus on an individual historical period, a director or group of directors, or on a theme in German film. Prerequisite(s): GERM 235 or 210 for GERM 337; sophomore standing or permission of instructor for GERM 337E; GERM 337E is cross listed with FILM 337; IC; T. Heidt

GERM 348 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff

GERM 395 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of German not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

GERM 395F

GERM 399 Senior Project (1/2 or 1)

Seniors prepare a study of appropriate scope in conjunction with any 300-level course in which they participate as regular students during their senior year. Students should identify the course in which they choose to do their project no later than the third term of their junior year and submit a preliminary topic and bibliography. With departmental approval students may undertake a project as an independent study. W; T. Heidt

GERM 400 Advanced Studies (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. T. Heidt

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Printed on Sunday, February 23, 2020