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Academics > Majors & Minors > French

Courses

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Caesar Akuetey

Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures (French)

2 East South Street

Galesburg, MN 61401-4999

309-341-7488

cakuetey@​knox.edu

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Course Descriptions

FREN 101. , FREN 102, FREN 103 Elementary French. (1)

Development of language skills: listening, comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Essentials of grammar complemented by readings in literature and culture, with extensive practice in speaking. Students must complete the sequence FREN 101, 102, 103 to fulfill the language requirement. Prerequisite(s): for 102, completion of 101; for 103, completion of 102; Students who have previously studied French must take the on-line placement test. Any exceptions to the placement recommendation must be approved by the department chair; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 101A. , FREN 103A Intensive Elementary French. (1)

Equivalent to elementary French, but designed for students who have taken French previously and who are not true beginners. Development of aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students must follow sequence of 101A and 103A to fulfill the language requirement. Students who have previously studied French must take the on-line placement test. Any exceptions to the placement recommendation must be approved by the department chair; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 101Q. Quick Start French I. (1 1/2)

Fall/December break. Intensive study of the language culminating in a two-week course in Paris and Besançon, France. The instruction in the fall term is motivated by the upcoming trip: grammar and vocabulary are structured around situations the students encounter while traveling. Target language instruction includes intensive drill session; additional instruction (in English and outside regular class meeting times) focuses attention on the history, the economy, and the geography of the region visited, and includes practical exercises and keeping a journal of activities. This gives the students hands-on experience with the French language that cannot be replicated in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor; The course requires an additional program fee for the December Break portion of the course; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 103Q. Quick Start French II. (1)

Further intensive study of French language and culture. Student journals from FREN 101Q serve as prime sources for discussion and exercises. The course tackles some of the more difficult aspects of French grammar such as passive voice, adjective endings and relative clauses. It also includes a series of lecture-discussions focusing on French political institutions, economic policy and participation in the European Union, and contemporary culture. The latter in particular is enhanced by viewing French films and television features from Knox's library collection and taped from direct satellite feed. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101Q or permission of the instructor; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 201. Intermediate French. (1)

This course seeks to consolidate students' skills in grammar and reinforce their listening, reading and writing abilities through a variety of formats including: written compositions, readings, and oral presentations. Readings will be taken from news articles, fiction and non-fiction, and poetry. Prerequisite(s): equivalent of FREN 103 or permission of the instructor; W; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 210. Conversation. (1)

This course is designed to develop proficiency in the four basic communicative skills of speaking, writing, listening, and reading French, and competence in the French and Francophone cultures of the world. The development of oral communication skills will be stressed throughout the course, and written competency in a variety of communicative functions will be emphasized as well. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201; or permission of the instructor; O; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 214. French-English Translation. (1/2 or 1)

An introduction to the art of translation, from French to English as well as English to French. Students will all work on several short texts, both literary and non-literary, then each one will work on an individual project. HUM; Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 or FREN 210; may be repeated once for credit; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 215. Introduction to French Literature. (1)

An introduction to the different literary genres - poetry, theatre, novel - and to approaches to a literary work. Focus on close reading and discussion of texts across the centuries. Examples of authors studied: Ronsard, Molière, Baudelaire, Zola. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 AND FREN 210; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 220. Francophone African Literature. (1)

An introduction to African authors who write in French. The texts exist in an underlying conflict between two cultures: African and European. The course emphasizes the relationship between the texts and the socio-economic and political structures. HUM; Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 or FREN 210; Cross Listing: AFST 220;AFST 220; C. Akuetey;

FREN 230. Introduction to French Culture. (1)

What is culture? Using a multifaceted approach - anthropological, semiotic, sociological - students will begin to define what it means to be French. Readings will address some of the symbols and icons of French life, such as the Tour de France, the Marseillaise, etc. Films will also be used to understand daily life. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 AND FREN 210; A. Steinberg;

FREN 248. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

FREN 295. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of French not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

FREN 304. Symbolist Poetry. (1)

Primarily a study of Baudelaire and Rimbaud, with supplementary study of Mallarmé, Verlaine and Nouveau. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 or permission of the instructor; C. Akuetey;

FREN 305. Topics in Nineteenth Century French Literature. (1)

The development of the Romantic movement, realism, naturalism, and symbolism. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 a 300 level FREN class; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 309. Topics in Twentieth Century Literature. (1)

A study of modern and contemporary authors, including Gide, Colette, Camus, Sartre, Proust, Apollinaire, Breton and others. Additional lectures on relevant music and art. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 or permission of the instructor; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 313. Topics in Seventeenth Century French Literature. (1)

Readings and discussions of the classic drama, Corneille, Racine, Molière, and some non-dramatic writers such as Pascal, Descartes, La Fontaine, and others. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 or a 300 level FREN class; A. Steinberg;

FREN 316. Topics in Eighteenth Century Literature. (1)

A century of evolutions and revolutions, the eighteenth century in France saw the emergence of an "Enlightenment" literature, philosophy, and thinkers. Voltaire and Rousseau might be the most famous authors, but writers like Marmontel, Rétif de la Bretonne, and Crébillon fils also participated in this intellectual effervescence. From love to manipulation, deceit and hypocrisy to morality and ethics, this course aims at developing an understanding of this century of ideas, focusing on various topics. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 or permission of the instructor; A. Steinberg;

FREN 320. Written and Oral French. (1)

Advanced practice in written and oral expression. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 AND FREN 210; A. Steinberg; C. Akuetey;

FREN 325. Topics in French Civilization. (1)

This course begins with a reflection on the concepts "nation" and "national identity" and then proceeds to identify and analyze the institutions and iconography that constitute the "deep structure" of France. How do the French remember the past? How have they "reconstructed" it? How do they view the world around them and their place in it? How do they view each other? As we attempt to find answers for these and other questions, it is necessary to look at those watershed events in French history that have over time transcended their reality and have been transformed into the myths that underlie and establish French identity. Prerequisite(s): FREN 230; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 330. or FREN 330E Great Themes of French Literature. (1)

(In French or English) A socio-historical study of the development of major themes and their adaptation to other literatures or disciplines. Some themes explored: Russian-French comparative literature, French literature and international opera, etc. Prerequisite(s): any literature course at the 300 level or permission of the instructor; FREN 330E satisfies HUM Foundations; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 330C. French Food for Thought. (1)

“Let them eat cake”, “bon appétit”, are common expressions used in English to either refer to Marie-Antoinette's faux pas before the hungry revolutionary crowd asking for bread in front of the Versailles palace, or to traditionally tell somebody to enjoy their meal. More than mere food, French cuisine and dishes have become an art and an inspiration throughout the world. But how are food and cuisine at the core of French culture? How is food such a savoir-vivre for the French people? Brillat-Savarin said in the 18th century: “Tell me what you eat: I'll tell you who you are”. How did/do French people eat? How did/does that define them? What is the place of food and cuisine in literature? This course aims at better understanding the representations and the symbolic aspects of food and cuisine in French literature as well as in its culture. Providing starters from the Middle-Ages, we will take our culinary discovery through the tasty 17th century to the spicy 18th century, adding a dash of table manners and theory in the 19th century to modern time diets and regimens, mixing a variety of formats and recipes. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215 or any French Literature course at the 300 level; A. Steinberg;

FREN 330G. Money in Literature. (1)

Whether it is the prehistoric barter, the gold quest, or the stock exchange trade, money is at the core of society. Money defines social behaviors, power figures and pushes men to extreme actions. What are people ready to do for/with money? Does money really make one happy? What is its actual value? From mere survival to absolute control, money becomes a leitmotiv that philosophers, writers, and movie directors have constantly described and commented on. This course aims at better understanding the representations of money in French literature from the classical to modern times by analyzing a variety of formats. Prerequisite(s): FREN 215; A. Steinberg;

FREN 348. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

FREN 395. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of French not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

FREN 399. Senior Project. (1/2 or 1)

This is a seminar style course with a common framework whose content varies according to the interests of the instructor and students. Possible topics include a specific author, a literary movement, a genre, a major historical event. Students craft a comprehensive term project which is validated by a research paper. W; May be taken once for 1.0 credit or twice for 0.5 credits; C. Akuetey; A. Steinberg;

FREN 400. Advanced Studies. (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. Staff;

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