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Academics > Majors & Minors > English Literature

Courses

Contact

Monica Berlin

Professor & Chair of English

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7195

mberlin@​knox.edu

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Ford Center for the Fine Arts

Requirements

Requirements for the Creative Writing major
12 credits as follows

  • Five writing courses from among: ENG 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 306, 307, 308, 309, or 311, as follows:
    • Two 200-level courses must be in at least two genres; with advisor approval one course in journalism may be counted as one genre course
    • Three courses must be at the 300-level
  • Five elective courses above the 100 level in literature, film, or theory as follows:
    • at least two courses must be at the 300-level
    • one course must be focused before 1900
    • one course must be in an underrepresented literature or in literature written in a language other than English, to be taken either in the original language or in translation (See list of approved courses below)*
  • One studio/allied art course, with an emphasis on the creative process, as offered by the programs in Art, Dance, Music, or Theatre
  • Senior portfolio for writing majors: ENG 399

Requirements for the Literature major
12 credits as follows:

  • Ways of Reading: ENG 200
  • One course in creative writing or journalism: ENG 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or 270
  • One survey course in American literature: ENG 231, 232, or 233
  • One survey course in English literature: ENG 251, 252, or 253
  • One additional survey course in American or English literature
  • One period course: ENG 335, 336, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, or 347
  • One single author course: ENG 330, 331, 332, 380, or 395 (when appropriate). Period and single author courses in other departments may be substituted with advisor approval
  • Four elective courses in literature, film, or theory, at least two of which must be at the 300-level and at least one of which must be focused before 1900. One elective may be taken in another department, with advisor approval.
  • ENG 300L, taken concurrently with a 300-level course
  • Senior seminar for literature majors: ENG 398.

No individual course may satisfy more than one major requirement.

Students may combine a major in English Literature with a minor in Creative Writing, a major in Creative Writing with a minor in Literature, or a double major in English Literature and Creative Writing as long as no more than two courses are used to satisfy requirements in each.

Students intending to pursue graduate work in English should consult with their advisor regarding suggested courses for graduate school preparation.

Requirements for the Creative Writing minor
6 credits as follows:

  • Introduction to Literature: ENG 120
  • Three Creative Writing courses (at least two at the 300-level)
  • One course in modern and/or contemporary literature
  • One course in an underrepresented literature or in literature written in a language other than English, to be taken either in the original language or in translation (this course may be taken in another department).*

Requirements for the English Literature minor
6 credits as follows:

  • Introduction to Literature: ENG 120
  • One survey course in English Literature: ENG 251, ENG 252, or ENG 253
  • One survey course in American Literature: ENG 231, ENG 232, or ENG 233
  • Two courses at the 300-level in literature
  • One course in an underrepresented literature or in literature written in a language other than English, to be taken either in the original language or in translation (this course may be taken in another department).*

*Courses currently approved in the category of underrepresented or non-English literature: AFST: 206, 220, 227, 233, 234, 235, 240, 335, 383; AMST: 227, 325; ASIA: 220, 221, 225, 263, 273, 321, 363, 373; CHIN: 221, 225,321; CLAS: 203, 273; ENG: 205, 242, 245 (and cross-listed offerings in other departments) FILM: 225, 227, 261, 309, 337 FREN: 214, 215, 220, 304, 305, 309, 313, 316, 330; GERM: 235, 302, 317, 324, 326, 328, 331, 332, 334, 337; GRK: 212,213,215-218, 270; GWST: 206, 221, 222, 235, 238, 261, 322, 325, 332, 383; JAPN: 263, 273, 363, 373; LAST 235, 238, 240, 305, 306, 309, 335, 377; LAT 212,213,215-218, 270, 370; SPAN: 235, 302, 305-309, 322, 330, 335, 337, 377; THTR: 351, 352, 353, 383

Students can petition the Chair of the English Department for possible substitutions when special, one-time offerings that focus on non-English Literature or Under-represented Literature are available. Inquiries should be made before the course begins.

English Course Descriptions

English Catalog Page

Course Descriptions

ENG 101. College Writing I. (1)

Basic instruction in expository writing. Emphasis on identifying an audience, formulating a thesis, developing an argument, supporting the argument, marshaling evidence, citing authorities, answering possible objections. Students are asked to respond to and analyze a variety of texts and to critique each other's work. ENG 101 includes a brief review of grammar and punctuation. Offered annually, WI; Staff;

ENG 102. College Writing II. (1)

Advanced instruction in expository writing. ENG 102 does not include a review of grammar and punctuation; it does include some library work and a research paper. The course is intended for all writers, weak or strong, who wish to improve their writing and research skills. W; Offered annually, SP; Staff;

ENG 104. Writing Studio. (1/2 or 1)

An introduction to the writing arts, this course will allow students to engage in creative practice through an exploration of techniques in craft. Students will learn how to generate and shape their writing, while experimenting with genre and elements of form. Specific offerings may vary from year to year, but all iterations will encourage students to develop a habit of practice, where the play of language can reshape familiar subjects or guide the writer toward new discoveries. ARTS; Can be taken twice for credit; Usually offered annually; Staff;

ENG 105. Reading Studio. (1/2 or 1)

An introduction to literary close reading, this course explores foundational approaches to interpretation alongside literature’s demonstrated capacity to reflect social, political and cultural predicaments. Students will engage questions of ongoing human significance that arise through the process of reading. This course will foster a community of readers who will guide one another to read more confidently. It will encourage and stimulate readers to consider, construct, and defend original interpretations of text. Specific offerings may vary from year to year, but all iterations will examine literature through close reading strategies. HUM; Can be taken twice for credit; Usually offered annually; Staff;

ENG 120. Introduction to Literature. (1)

This course is an introduction to the forms, terminology and critical reading strategies associated with the literary genres of fiction, poetry, and, at the instructor's discretion, one other genre. HUM; W; Offered annually, usually every term; Staff;

ENG 123. Foundations of Theatre and Drama. (1)

An introductory study of theatre as a collaborative art form, examining dramatic writing and theatrical production, and the process whereby scripts are translated into performance by theatre artists, and exploring theatre's capacity to reflect and promote social, political, and cultural change. HUM; Cross Listing: THTR 151; W; N. Blackadder; J. Grace; E. Metz;

ENG 124. Introduction to Film. (1)

Film is studied as a distinct art form with its own means and ends. Films are selected that are representative of various periods or major advances and are studied from historical, theoretical, and formal perspectives. HUM; Cross Listing: FILM 124; Offered annually, FA and SP; R. Smith; E. Anderson;

ENG 125. The Bible in Literature. (1)

An introduction to the literary aspects of the Bible and its influence on the Western literary and artistic imagination. The course will focus on reading selections from the Bible alongside literary texts on which the Bible has had an impact. Some attention will also be given to cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts. The course will prepare students for more advanced study in writing, literature, and religious studies. HUM; Cross Listing: RELS 125; W; Usually offered annually; G. Franco; C. Fitch;

ENG 200. Ways of Reading. (1)

Students analyze and assess their own assumptions about what constitutes the act of "reading." We pursue a detailed investigation of the processes of representation and interpretation in order to consider the many different "ways" of reading texts. Integrating theory and practice, we test the usefulness of the models provided by such movements as New Criticism, Feminism, Reader-Response, Deconstruction, Psychoanalysis, New Historicism, and Queer Theory to the situated analysis of a variety of literary and cultural texts. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 or permission of the instructor; Offered annually, usually multiple terms; R. Smith; E. Anderson; G. Franco; N. Rosenfeld;

ENG 201. Business and Technical Writing. (1)

The course is intended for any student wishing to improve written communication skills, but especially for those students who want to gain skills in writing clear and effective business-related prose. The course focuses on the business and technical writing skills necessary to communicate effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students analyze, evaluate, and create a variety of professional documents: letters, memos, resumes, reports, proposals, business plans, presentations, etc. Cross Listing: BUS 201;BUS 201;CTL 201; W; J. Haslem;

ENG 202. Teaching Writing. (1)

The course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the theory, practice, and pedagogy of writing. What defines good writing? How do we learn to write? What are the most effective ways to work with writers one-on-one and in the classroom? As we answer these questions, students learn not only how to effectively teach writing, but also how to improve their own writing. Cross Listing: CTL 202; W; J. Haslem;

ENG 203. The Careful Editor. (1)

This course will acquaint you with the book publishing industry. We will discuss how a manuscript travels from author to finished product and how that process is now changing. We will introduce you to the role of the book editor and provide famous examples of editor and writer relationships. The course will also give you an opportunity to learn line-by-line editing skills, following The Chicago Manual of Style, while in the process honing your own writing skills. Usually offered annually, usually SP; K. Reno;

ENG 204. Genres and Forms. (1)

This course will introduce the concept of literary classification (genre) through the focused exploration of one particular species (form). Possible offerings may include Lyric Essay, the Ode, the Novella, etc. Students will learn to identify generic traits and to analyze forms (within a genre) by examining the evolution and workings of their internal design. Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 123 or 125 strongly recommended; sophomore standing or permission of the instructor; Offered annually; Staff;

ENG 205. Beginning Poetry Translation. (1)

Discussion of theory, contemporary practice, and student work, plus conferences with members of the language faculties. ARTS; Prerequisite(s): Proficiency in a language taught at Knox besides English; ENG 208 strongly recommended; Offered alternate years; G. Franco;

ENG 206. Beginning Creative Nonfiction Writing. (1)

A seminar in the writing of various kinds of contemporary nonfiction. Discussion of published writers and student work, plus individual conferences. ARTS; Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 or 105 or 120 or 125 or permission of the instructor; W; Offered annually, usually every term; N. Rosenfeld; N. Regiacorte; C. Simpson; C. Fitch; M. Berlin;

ENG 207. Beginning Fiction Writing. (1)

A seminar on contemporary fiction writing. Discussion of published writers and student work, plus conferences. ARTS; Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 or 105 or 120 or 125 or permission of the instructor; W; Usually offered every term; R. Metz; B. Tannert-Smith; C. Simpson; C. Fitch; S. Kiraly;

ENG 208. Beginning Poetry Writing. (1)

A seminar on contemporary poetry writing. Discussion of published writers and student work, plus conferences. ARTS; Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 or 105 or 120 or 125 or permission of the instructor; W; Offered annually, usually every term; M. Berlin; G. Franco; N. Regiacorte;

ENG 209. Beginning Playwriting. (1)

An introduction to the craft of dramatic writing. In a workshop format, students learn about the elements of playwriting through the study of several published one-acts and the composition and revision of one or more short plays. ARTS; Prerequisite(s): THTR 151/ENG 123 or THTR 131 or ENG 207 or ENG 208; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 209; W; Offered annually, usually multiple terms; N. Blackadder; S. Kiraly;

ENG 221. Gender and Literature. (1)

Emphasis is on the use of gender as a category of analysis by which to examine literary characters, styles, and techniques, as well as the circumstances and ideology of authors, readers, and the literary canon. HUM; Cross Listing: GWST 221; DV; M. Roy-Fequiere; staff;

ENG 223. Introduction to Children's Literature. (1)

This course is designed to familiarize students with various types of children's literature, including folklore, modern fantasy, picture books and realistic fiction. Students will learn how to evaluate the literary standards and pluralistic character of the literature. Authors may include Nodelman, Park, Lowery, Pullman, Taylor and Feiffer. Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually; B. Tannert-Smith;

ENG 225. History and Structure of the English Language. (1)

This course investigates the English language, beginning with the theory and principles of syntactic analysis. The course next traces the English language from its Indo-European roots to its contemporary manifestations around the world. Ultimately, we will consider how an understanding of the history and structure of the language can help us analyze literary texts more fully. Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 or sophomore standing; Offered alternate years; E. Anderson;

ENG 227. Introduction to Shakespeare. (1)

Four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare's texts enthrall audiences and readers and have come to define great English literature. This course introduces students to Shakespeare's canon and to the historical, political, religious, and artistic contexts in which he wrote. Students read a range of Shakespeare's dramatic and non-dramatic work from across the scope of his career, including at least three of the four dramatic genres in which he wrote (comedy, tragedy, history, romance) and samples of his shorter or longer poetry. The course also considers Shakespeare's continuing relevance through modern film and stage adaptation. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 123 or 125 or sophomore standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 281; Offered annually; C. Rosell;

ENG 231. American Literature I. (1)

A survey of literature from colonization through the major authors of the mid-nineteenth century. We examine the formation of an American literary tradition in the context of cultural, intellectual, political and economic developments. Authors may include de Vaca, Bradstreet, Edwards, Wheatley, Emerson, Melville, Dickinson, Stoddard, Brent, Douglass and Stowe. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually, usually FA; R. Smith;

ENG 232. American Literature II. (1)

A survey of literatures produced in the United States since the Civil War. We examine relationships between cultural and intellectual currents and the political, economic, and social development of the United States during this period, focusing particularly on race, gender and class as analytic categories. Authors may include Howells, Twain, Jewett, Chopin, Cather, Chesnutt, Fitzgerald, Pynchon, Cisneros, Morrison, Harjo, Gibson. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually, usually WI; R. Smith;

ENG 233. African-American Literature. (1)

A survey of African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Major literary movements, major writers, and folk literature are studied in historical, cultural and purposive context. Consideration is given to the form and language of the literature, as well as to the question of cultural repression. HUM; Cross Listing: AFST 233; DV; Offered alternate years; F. Hord;

ENG 234. African and Black Caribbean Literature. (1)

A survey of twentieth-century African and Black Caribbean literature. After tracing the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century backgrounds of that literature, the Indigenism, Negritude, and Negrista movements are explored, including the interaction between African and Black Caribbean writers. Post-World War II writing includes emphasis on its increased visibility in the 1950s, and the art, nationalism/Pan-Africanism, and orality orientations since 1960; and the question of language. HUM; Cross Listing: AFST 234; F. Hord;

ENG 235. African American Women Writers. (1)

A broad survey of the poetry, fiction, autobiographies and literary criticism of African American women. Beginning with late eighteenth-century poetry, we explore the themes and images of black women and men, language, settings and form of that literature. With African American women at the center of discourse speaking as subjects, we further examine the interlocking of gender, race, and class and the uniqueness of their experience as reflected in their literature, as well as how the historical context of internal colonialism has affected their voices. Alternate years. HUM; Cross Listing: AFST 235;GWST 235; DV; Offered alternate years; M. Roy-Fequiere;

ENG 242. Postcolonialism. (1)

Against the background of socio-political issues like colonialism, nationalism, and race and gender, and in the stream of literary heritages like modernism, this course undertakes an exploration into the prose of Bessie Head and Chinua Achebe (Africa), V. S. Naipaul and Michelle Cliff (the Caribbean), Kamala Markandaya and Raja Rao (India), and the poetry of Wole Soyinka (Africa), Derek Walcott (the Caribbean) and Anita Desai (India), among others, that is supplemented by a consideration of the "colonial" and "postcolonial" theories of Franz Fanon, Aime Cesaire, Homi Bhaba, Benita Parry and Gayatri Spivak. Prerequisite(s): at least sophomore standing; at least one course in music, art, literature, political science or history. Concurrent course in the humanities, history, or social sciences recommended; DV; Offered occasionally; N. Rosenfeld;

ENG 243. U.S. Latino Literature: Identity and Resistance. (1)

The course examines major works by U.S. Latino writers. We explore the themes of identity and resistance as they are developed in the poetry, fiction, theater and essays of Chicano and Puerto Rican authors. Taking as our starting point the cultural nationalist discourses developed by the Chicano writers in the late 1960s, we analyze Puerto Rican and Chicano critiques of the American ideal of the "melting pot." We see how poets, novelists and dramatists have grappled with questions regarding Spanish as a proud marker of identity, with the impossibility of the return to an ideal Island paradise, or to an "Aztlan." In addition, special attention is given to the discussion of gender dynamics as they are expressed in the literature and culture. M. Roy-Fequiere;

ENG 245. Literature and Power. (1)

A study of the relationship between literature and power. This course will examine the cultural forces that influence the creation, circulation, and interpretation of texts. Specific offerings may vary from year to year, but in each incarnation, the course will examine literature through the lens of cultural diversity and power. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 or 200; DV; Offered annually, usually multiple terms; Staff;

ENG 247. Moral Life in Literature. (1)

Literature raises two different types of moral questions: those concerned with the moral parameters guiding the creative process and those dealing with the moral issues raised from within the literary work itself. This course examines both issues. Regarding the former, we ask: Must good literature be moral or can an accomplished work of art be immoral? If there are moral guidelines for the production of literature, what are they? Regarding the latter, we use literature to better understand particular moral issues. What, for example, can literature add to our understanding of friendship, courage, community and the pursuit of individuality? In short, how can novelists help us better understand the human good? Cross Listing: PHIL 247; W. Young;

ENG 248. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

ENG 251. English Literature I. (1)

A study of English literature in its social, intellectual, and historical contexts in the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, and Renaissance periods. Emphasis is on literary works by major early writers and on the intellectual, social, and political movements that inform the literature. Authors read may include the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Donne, and works by less frequently canonized writers. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually, usually FA; C. Rosell;

ENG 252. English Literature II. (1)

A study of English literature from the late seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. The emphasis is on major Restoration, Enlightenment, Romantic, and Victorian writers in their historical and cultural contexts. The evolution of literary styles and genres is related to the intellectual, political, social, and religious movements of the respective periods. Authors read may include Behn, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens and Barrett-Browning. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually, usually WI; G. Franco; E. Anderson;

ENG 253. Modern British, Irish and American Literature. (1)

A study of poetry and fiction from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth century, with attention to the relationship between the disintegration of traditional moral, social and intellectual values and the development of new literary forms. Authors include Yeats, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, and Rhys. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 105 or 120 or 125 strongly recommended; Offered annually, usually SP; N. Rosenfeld;

ENG 261. Women and Film. (1)

This is a course examining the representation of women in the cinematic medium. We will especially focus on the intersection of two interpretive theories, psychoanalysis and feminism, and their multi-varied application to the literary text that is cinema, with particular interest in questions of dream, hysteria and transference. Prerequisites: ENG 124 or permission of instructor. Students need familiarity with basic film technique and history. HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 124 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: FILM 261;GWST 261; Offered occasionally; R. Smith;

ENG 270. News Writing and Reporting. (1)

This course introduces print journalism through an exploration of its mindset and fundamental forms. Writing- and reporting-intensive, it involves regular assignments for publication about local issues and events, with readings and class discussion. Focusing on Galesburg as a microcosm of reporting anywhere, students form the Knox News Team, meet with city officials and business leaders, and cover stories ranging from recycling to law enforcement to the arts. Articles are regularly printed in local daily and weekly newspapers and on-line venues. Topics include: story research; interviewing and developing a source; covering standard news beats; style and structure of news stories; fact-checking; meeting deadlines; journalism and the law. HUM; Cross Listing: JOUR 270; W; J. Dyer;

ENG 275. Advanced Composition. (1)

Students will be given formal instruction in advanced composition with a particular emphasis on written argumentation as a part of the rhetorical tradition. Topics will include the history of rhetoric and its relevance today, particularly in terms of the written argument, recognizing and avoiding logical fallacies, the various ways to appeal to an audience, and writing as a way to construct knowledge. Cross Listing: CTL 275; W; J. Haslem;

ENG 295. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of literature or related topics not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

ENG 300L. Library Research. (.0)

This lab is a co- or prerequisite for certain 300-level courses in the English department (see course descriptions). It teaches the fundamental research strategies students will need in order to write informed and relevant literary criticism. Students learn to evaluate and cite sources, produce annotated bibliographies, and use the library's databases and resources to their fullest. Offered annually, usually every term; Staff;

ENG 306. Creative Nonfiction Workshop. (1)

Intensive work in the reading and writing of creative nonfiction; workshops plus individual conferences. Prerequisite(s): ENG 206 or written permission of the instructor; May be taken three terms; O; W; Offered annually, multiple terms; N. Regiacorte; M. Berlin; C. Fitch;

ENG 307. Fiction Workshop. (1)

Intensive work in the reading and writing of fiction; workshops plus individual conferences. Prerequisite(s): ENG 207 or written permission of the instructor; May be taken three terms; O; W; Offered annually, multiple terms; R. Metz; B. Tannert-Smith; C. Simpson; C. Fitch; S. Kiraly;

ENG 308. Poetry Workshop. (1)

Intensive work in the reading and writing of poetry; workshops plus individual conferences. Prerequisite(s): ENG 208 or written permission of the instructor; May be taken three terms; O; W; Offered annually, multiple terms; M. Berlin; N. Regiacorte; G. Franco;

ENG 309. Playwriting and Screenwriting Workshop. (1)

Intensive work in the writing of plays and film or television scripts; workshops and individual conferences. Prerequisite(s): ENG 209 or THTR 209 or written permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 309; W; May be taken three terms; Offered annually; N. Blackadder; S. Kiraly;

ENG 311. Advanced Writing. (1/2 or 1)

Individual projects in writing non-fiction, fiction, poetry, or drama. Conducted on a tutorial basis by members of the department. Prerequisite(s): Reserved for exceptional students, after consultation, and with written permission of the instructor; May be repeated for credit; O; W; Offered occasionally; Staff;

ENG 320. Fairy Tale: Historical Roots and Cultural Development. (1)

Focusing mainly on the European fairy tale (Italian, French, German, English), the course seeks understanding of the genre's roots in early modern oral culture; of its transition to fashionable literary circles and to children's bookshelves; of its relationship to issues of class and gender; and of its psychological appeal. Some attention also given to modern and postmodern American and film treatments of the fairy tale. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently; W; Offered occasionally; B. Tannert-Smith;

ENG 323. Studies in Adolescent Literature. (1)

The course will consider the evolution of young adult literature as a literary genre and a consumer market using a variety of representative texts and critical approaches and with a specific focus on the ways in which this literature constructs and commodifies the adolescent experience. Authors may include J.D. Salinger, S.E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, David Levithan, and Laurie Halse Anderson. Prerequisite(s): ENG 223 and one other 200-level course in literature, film or theory. ENG 200 strongly recommended; Offered alternate years; B. Tannert-Smith;

ENG 327. English Prosody. (1)

An intensive study of rhythmic expressivity in poetry written in English, with regular scansion and analyses of various texts from the 14th to the 20th century, from Geoffrey Chaucer to Bob Dylan. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory or junior standing, or permission of the instructor; Usually offered alternate years; N. Regiacorte;

ENG 330. Chaucer. (1)

Focus on Chaucer's poetry (in the Middle English) with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde and on the cultural and literary contexts in which Chaucer wrote. We read selected Chaucerian sources as well as secondary sources on medieval life, customs, and culture. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered occasionally; Staff;

ENG 331. Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies. (1)

Study of Shakespeare's histories and comedies with combined attention to the plays as rich poetry and as texts for performance. Some discussion of the plays in connection with selected critical essays on them, and some in-class analysis of scenes from filmed productions of the plays. HUM; Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 381; Offered alternate years; C. Rosell;

ENG 332. Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances. (1)

Study of Shakespeare's tragedies and romances with combined attention to the plays as rich poetry and as texts for performance. Some discussion of the plays in connection with selected critical essays on them, and some in-class analysis of scenes from filmed productions of the plays. HUM; Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 382; Offered alternate years; C. Rosell;

ENG 334. Literary Criticism. (1)

This course is a highly focused workshop-seminar designed to facilitate the careful discussion of a few selected literary-critical theories and their application to a range of literary and cultural texts. Theories discussed may include: new historicism; reader-response criticism; feminist criticism; deconstruction; Marxist criticism; Queer theory, etc. Prerequisite(s): ENG 200 and one additional 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; Offered alternate years; E. Anderson; G. Franco; N. Rosenfeld;

ENG 335. Studies in American Romanticism. (1)

Specific offerings may vary from year to year. Individual topics of study may include "The American 'Renaissance' Revisited"; "American Women Writers of the 19th-Century"; "Literature and Moral Reform"; "Antebellum Poetics: Poe, Whitman, Dickinson". Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 231 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered alternate years; R. Smith;

ENG 336. Studies in the Literatures of America. (1)

A study of the proliferation of American literatures since 1860. Specific offerings vary from year to year but might include: "Fiction of the Gilded Age"; "The Rise of Naturalism"; "The Harlem Renaissance"; "Midwestern Literature"; "Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States"; "American Postmodernism"; and "American Gothic." Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 232 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered alternate years; R. Smith;

ENG 342. Renaissance Literature and Culture. (1)

Explores the crossover between a complex cultural issue from the 15th to 17th centuries and a set of literary and/or dramatic texts from the same period. Possible topics: culturally based representations of the body; social constructions of gender and the "gender wars"; class issues and "carnivalesque" literature. Possible authors: Spenser, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Webster, Milton, selected female poets; selected male and female pamphleteers. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 251 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered alternate years; C. Rosell;

ENG 343. Enlightenment Literature. (1)

Studies in English Neoclassical and Pre-Romantic literature with emphasis on satire and the novel. Authors read may include Swift, Defoe, Pope, Fielding, Burney, Sterne, Richardson and Radcliffe. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 252 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered alternate years; E. Anderson;

ENG 344. Romantic Literature. (1)

Emphasis on the Romantics as the first generation of writers to face a universe that did not have a built-in meaning. The old Medieval-Renaissance world view, which was still operative in Pope's Essay on Man, no longer served the needs of the Romantic writers, who looked elsewhere for new sources of meaning: to Nature, to the inner self, to romantic love, and to the transcendence (real or imaginary) of art itself. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 252 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: RELS 344; W; Offered every other year; G. Franco; E. Anderson;

ENG 345. Victorian Literature. (1)

Seminar on the major Victorian writers, 1832-1900. Emphasis is either on novelists such as Dickens, Eliot and Bronte, or poets such as Tennyson, Browning and Rossetti. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 and ENG 252 strongly recommended) and ENG 300L, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; W; Offered alternate years; E. Anderson; G. Franco;

ENG 346. Modern and/or Contemporary Poetry. (1)

A study of Modern and contemporary poetry. Attention is directed toward various traditions and innovations in poetic art. Emphasis will vary, but may include consideration of specific authors, themes, movements, and trends in the field. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory, or permission of the instructor; Usually offered every year; M. Berlin; N. Regiacorte; G. Franco;

ENG 347. Modern and/or Contemporary Fiction. (1)

A study of modern and contemporary fiction. Attention is directed toward various traditions and innovations in narrative art as they reflect and incorporate shifting attitudes toward love, marriage, family, social groups and institutions, nature, technology, war, and the relationship of individuals to fundamental economic and political forces. Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory, or permission of the instructor; W; DV; Usually offered every year; R. Metz; N. Rosenfeld;

ENG 348. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

ENG 351. World Theatre and Drama I: Greeks through the Renaissance. (1)

A study of the origins and evolution of drama and theatre beginning with Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe through Early Modern England, Italy, and France. Additional examination of the development of theatrical practice in Japan, China, and India. HUM; Prerequisite(s): At least one literature course (THTR 151/ENG 123 is preferred) and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 351; N. Blackadder; J. Grace;

ENG 352. World Theatre and Drama II: Restoration through World War I. (1)

A study of the developments of dramatic forms and major theatrical movements from Restoration era comedies (1660) through World War I. Additional examination of influences from nonwestern traditions. Focus placed on the theatre as a cultural, social, political, industrial, and economic institution. HUM; Prerequisite(s): at least one literature course (THTR 151/ENG 123 is preferred) and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 352; W; N. Blackadder; E. Metz; J. Grace; Staff;

ENG 353. World Theatre and Drama III: 1915 to the Present. (1)

A study of the developments of dramatic forms and major theatrical movements throughout the world from 1915 to the present. The plays are discussed in their literary, cultural, social, political, and theatrical contexts. HUM; Prerequisite(s): at least one literature course (THTR 151/ENG 123 is preferred) and sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 353; DV; N. Blackadder; E. Metz; J. Grace;

ENG 363. Film Theories. (1)

This course will explore one or more of the main currents in film theory, which include formalist, realist, structuralist, psychoanalytic, feminist, poststructuralist, cognitivist, and cultural-contextualist approaches to questions regarding the nature, function and possibilities of cinema. Specific offerings will vary from year to year. Topics of study may include "Genre versus Auteur", "Psychoanalysis and Film", "Narrative and Film", "Experimental Film", and "Noir". HUM; Prerequisite(s): ENG 124 and one 200-level course in literature, film, or theory (ENG 200 recommended) and ENG 300L which may be taken concurrently, or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: FILM 363; Offered alternate years; R. Smith; E. Anderson;

ENG 370. Feature Writing and Narrative Journalism. (1)

Students study the feature article, its distinguished history--including the birth of the Muckrakers at Knox College--and its alternative forms, including the underground press and "new journalism" beginning in the 1960s, narrative journalism, and online story-telling today. Students also produce professional quality feature stores, some in narrative journalism form, drawing on a broad range of communication skills, including critical thinking, reporting, research, writing and edition. Prerequisite(s): JOUR 270 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: JOUR 370; W; Staff;

ENG 371. In-Depth Reporting. (1)

Passionate, fact-based investigative news stories can have a profound impact on society, as the history of McClure's Magazine and the Muckrakers demonstrates. In this course, students work in teams on locally based topics of national significance to produce a substantial investigative story of publishable quality. Students confer with subject-area mentors who provide guidance in research and understanding the technical, scientific or other specialized issues involved. The course will involve substantial background research and interviewing, in addition to writing a major investigative feature story. Prerequisite(s): JOUR 270 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: JOUR 371; W; Staff;

ENG 380. Studies in English and American Literature. (1)

Concentration on one or two English or American writers, or on a period or genre. Writers vary from term to term. HUM; Prerequisite(s): two 200-level courses in literature, film, or theory or permission of the instructor; May be repeated, with permission of the instructor; Offered annually, usually multiple terms; Staff;

ENG 383. Women Playwrights. (1)

Analysis of the works of female playwrights who represent diversity in race, nationality, perspective, and style. A brief review of the evolution of feminisms is traced in order to identify the areas of thought and conflict that most influence the condition of the female writer and specifically the playwright. Prerequisite(s): junior standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: AFST 383;GWST 383;THTR 383; W; DV; E. Metz;

ENG 384. American Drama and Theatre. (1)

This course is a survey of dramatic writing and theatrical expression in America. Close investigation placed on themes such as the American dream, the American family, and the struggle for racial, ethnic, economic, and sexual equality. Plays are discussed within particular social, historical, political, and artistic frameworks. Prerequisite(s): junior standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 384; N. Blackadder; J. Grace;

ENG 386. Theatre and Society. (1)

A study of the relationship between theatre and society. This course examines a variety of plays and theatre practitioners and theoreticians, focusing on theatre's capacity to reflect and participate in social, political and cultural discourse. Specific topics vary from term to term. Prerequisite(s): junior standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 386; N. Blackadder; J. Grace; E. Metz;

ENG 386C. Musical Theatre History. (1)

This course will examine the history of American and European musical theatre from 1900 to the present. Students will examine dramatic writings and recorded performances from this period with emphasis placed on the social, cultural, and economic contexts in which the musicals were written and performed. Additionally, we will investigate trends in style that include composition, direction, and choreography. At the conclusion of this course, students will have an understanding of the development of musical theatre within particular social, historical, and artistic frameworks. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 386C; J. Grace;

ENG 387. Studies in Dramatic Literature. (1)

Close examination of the work of a single playwright or theatre practitioner (such as Caryl Churchill or Bertolt Brecht), or of a period (e.g., Jacobean) or genre (e.g., tragedy). Prerequisite(s): junior standing or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: THTR 387; N. Blackadder; J. Grace; E. Metz;

ENG 394. Topics in Investigative Journalism. (1)

Topics vary from term to term as does the media platform in which the story or stories are told. Cross Listing: JOUR 374; Staff;

ENG 395. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of literature or related topics not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

ENG 398. Senior Seminar for Literature Majors. (1)

The seminar focuses on issues in literature that are currently being discussed or debated nationally or internationally. The term culminates with a conference at which each student presents a researched paper and answers questions from the audience. Prerequisite(s): senior standing; W; O; Offered annually, WI; R. Smith; N. Rosenfeld; E. Anderson; G. Franco;

ENG 399. Senior Portfolio for Writing Majors. (1)

The Senior Portfolio consists of two parts: an edited selection of the student's writing and an introduction of approximately twenty-five pages. Prerequisite(s): senior standing; Offered annually, SP; M. Berlin; R. Metz; N. Regiacorte; C. Fitch; C. Simpson;

ENG 400. Advanced Studies. (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. Staff;

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