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Scott DeWitt

Chair & Associate Professor of Educational Studies

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401

309-341-7047

swdewitt@​knox.edu

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Ford Center for the Fine Arts

EDUC 201 School and Society

Acquaints students with the forces that have shaped the formation of American public education and explores the social context of which schools are a part. The relationships between the school and the wider social, political, economic, and cultural forces are explored. Course includes 20 hours of community service. Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year, first-term students; Cross Listing: ANSO 201; SA; PI; Offered every term; J. Estes; J. Foubert; N. Williams; S. DeWitt; A. Dougherty

EDUC 202 History of Education

An examination of the ways in which schooling in the United States has addressed issues such as educational aims, opportunity, curriculum and pedagogy. The relationship between socio-political contexts and education, the trends and processes of educational change, and linkages between past and current educational practices are also considered. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: HIST 202; SA; Offered alternating terms; D. Dougherty

EDUC 203 Philosophy of Education

A critical examination of some assumptions about education embraced by historical and contemporary philosophers, and relevance of these assumptions to U.S. schooling. Philosophical questions are considered, such as "What does it mean to teach?" and "What is knowledge?" Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: PHIL 215; SA; Generally offered winter; D. Dougherty

EDUC 204 Psychological Foundations of Education

This course gives students a conceptual foundation for understanding how learning takes place using theories and models from psychology and psychology adjacent disciplines. The ideas presented in this course draw from multiple paradigms, including behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and social cognitivism. Some driving questions for the course include: "What is intelligence?", "What gets people motivated?" and "How do people make sense of failure?". As part of making connections between theory and practice, students are required to complete a minimum of 25 hours of practicum (in local school classrooms when possible). Advisor note: Students without transportation have the option of using the local public transportation system (Galesburg City's Fixed Route Bus Service) or may arrange rideshare with their peers. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: PSYC 273; Offered twice a year (generally fall and winter); M. Lyons; staff

EDUC 205 Adolescent Development

This course introduces students to the stage of human development known as adolescence using an approach that draws theories from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and biology. Some driving questions that guide this course include: "What is the influence of nature and the environment on human development?, "How do peer relationships affect adolescent behavior?", and "How does family affect adolescents' beliefs about the world?". This course also focuses on contemporary issues in society, such as toxic masculinity, social media use, mental health, body image, and bullying. This course offers the value of helping students to better understand and support the needs of young people in their lives. Students who aspire toward careers in health care, counseling, social work, and law are especially encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 204; Cross Listing: PSYC 206; Offered twice a year (generally fall and spring); M. Lei; staff

EDUC 207 Technology in the Classroom (1/2)

This course is an introduction to the underlying principles of, and methods for, effective integration of educational technologies into classroom practice. This course will develop pre-service teachers' knowledge of specific technologies designed for educational settings (such as apps for student assessment and parent/family communication) as well as technologies with educational uses. Students will connect this new knowledge to theories of learning and content-area teaching methods to practice integrating appropriate educational technologies for specific learning goals. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201; Offered spring; Staff

EDUC 208 Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum (1/2)

This course focuses on the uses of writing and reading as ways to learn across the curriculum. Educators interested in elementary through high school instruction, in all content areas, will learn about ways to set up a classroom, assess student readiness levels, analyze this assessment, and plan instruction to maximize student learning. Reading and writing strategies students can use will also be examined. Offered fall and spring;

EDUC 209 Foundations of ESL and Bilingual Education

This course introduces students to a range of foundational topics in teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) in English as a Second Language (ESL) and Bilingual classrooms. Topics include history and current practices, ELL demographics, second language development, issues of equity in practice and assessment, and ELL advocacy. The course will also introduce students to the basic principles underlying effective ESL and Bilingual instruction. This course is applicable to any student wanting to teach ELLs in classrooms in the United States or internationally. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201; Offered winter term; Staff

EDUC 210 Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL

This course develops students' knowledge of instructional strategies for English Learners in English as a Second Language (ESL) settings. The course focuses on a range of topics fundamental to effective ESL instruction, including: Theories of academic language and second language acquisition, differentiation of instruction and assessment based on students' language needs, and assessing language proficiency and content knowledge. Students incorporate this knowledge into a variety of authentic instructional planning tasks throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 209 or permission of the instructor; Offered alternate years, spring; Staff

EDUC 211 Prison Education: A Practicum

Drawing on theories of critical pedagogy and critical race, this course will use the text Turning Teaching Inside Out: A Pedagogy of Transformation for Community-based Education to explore community-based learning, especially as it relates to communities who are incarcerated. Students will engage with the theory and currently identified best practices for educative partnering with people in prison. Classroom experiences will interrogate the journey from safe spaces to brave spaces, while introducing strategies for developing anti-oppression, non-hierarchical classrooms. Cross Listing: PJST 211; SA, PI; L. Trapedo Sims

EDUC 212 Inclusion in the Diverse Workplace: A Global Perspective

This course is designed to help students fully understand the concepts of multiculturalism, cultural tolerance, inclusivity, and social empowerment in the workplace. Using case studies, students are prompted to question ethical concerns surrounding cultural diversity, equity, and equality. Through inquiry-oriented tasks, they examine opportunities and challenges in the intersection of cultures in professional settings and develop multiple perspectives and strategies for supporting inclusivity. Successful completion of the course results in a critical awareness about cultural humility, color-blindness myth, linguistic and cultural responsiveness. The course provides skills for checking biases, debunking one-size-fits-all models, growing people's appreciation in multiculturalism, and cultivating flexible minds of global citizens. It builds an enhanced knowledge base for preventing micro-aggression and discriminatory practices in workplaces. Staff

EDUC 213 Inside-Out: Restorative Justice

This course introduces students to the process of Restorative Justice: its transformative potential and limitations. We focus on models of restorative justice within Indigenous communities in North America and restorative justice (pu'uhonua) in Hawai'i and other transnational model--the Rangatahi Courts of New Zealand and the Pasifika Youth Courts. We focus on the vital contributions of Indigenous feminism (s) to restorative justice: healing as resistance, organizing movements around healing; and resistance to mental health, engaging in radical acts of self-love, from the identities of Native and Indigenous women. Prerequisite(s): PJST 211; Cross Listing: PJST 213; L. Trapedo Sims

EDUC 225 Bilingual and ESL Assessment

This course builds students' knowledge of and skills with assessment for English learners. The course focuses on three fundamental aspects: Assessment of English language proficiency, Assessment of content area knowledge, and Issues of assessment especially affecting English learners (such as validity, reliability, and bias). Throughout the course, students create and modify formative and summative assessments for various content areas and gain exposure to standardized language proficiency tests for English learners. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 209, or permission of the instructor; Staff

EDUC 231 History of Mexican American Education in the Midwest (1/2)

Students will explore the educational and community experiences of ethnic Mexicans in Eastern Iowa and Western Illinois through a series of seminars, field trips, and service projects that will immerse them in local history and contextualize contemporary struggle. During the first half of the program, participants will be exposed to texts that situate the struggles of ethnic Mexican children and their families in the midwest and that introduce key issues related to their schooling reaching back to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and ending with contemporary debates over the ways in which local ethnic histories should be included in school. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor; D. Dougherty

EDUC 248 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff

EDUC 286 History Pedagogy for Future Educators

Created for students who will become elementary teachers, high school social studies teachers, or who are Created for students who will become elementary teachers, high school social studies teachers, or who are headed to graduate school in history, this course offers an introduction to critical thinking (and action) in the classroom. Taking our cue from bell hooks' Teaching to Transgress, we will explore theories of inclusive, equitable history instruction, as well as practical strategies for teaching the past. Cross Listing: HIST 286; C. Denial

EDUC 295 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Educational Studies not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

EDUC 301 Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World

This course emphasizes social justice education with particular attention to intersecting identities and experiences including, for example, dis/ability, race, ethnicity, immigration, language, religion, class, gender, and sexual orientation. We will address policy and practice, legislation, rights and responsibilities of teachers, and relationships with families and communities. Students enrolled in the course are responsible for completing a practicum experience of 25 hours. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of EDUC 201, EDUC 202 or 203, and EDUC 204, or permission of the instructor; Offered fall and winter; S. DeWitt; M. Lei

EDUC 310 Perspectives on Curriculum and Instruction

This course focuses on the theories and practices utilized in planning and executing curriculum, including the crafting and delivering of instruction, classroom and behavioral management, and various approaches to assessment with particular focus on differentiation and lesson and unit planning. Includes in-depth investigation of quality curriculum including a review of contemporary approaches and modification of these for a range of learners. Students enrolled in the course are responsible for completing a practicum experience of 20 hours. A: Elementary; B: Secondary; C: Special Content Area. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 301; Offered every winter; M. Lyons; S. DeWitt

EDUC 310A

EDUC 310B

EDUC 310C

EDUC 310D

EDUC 312 Teaching Reading/Language Arts (1/2 or 1)

Reading and writing are predicated on teachers providing students with a solid grounding in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction. Theoretical foundations of understanding how children learn to read and write will be explored. Effective reading instruction hinges on an awareness of the language development of each individual student and the language content of the text. This course deals with how students learn to read and the content of reading. Attention shifts from "learning to read" to "reading to learn", and from working with small groups to effective differentiation needed to work with entire classrooms of children. A: Elementary Grades; B: Middle Grades; C: Secondary; D: Special Content Area. Students enrolled in EDUC 312A are responsible for completing a practicum experience of 40 hours. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; Offered every spring; M. Lyons; S. Hinman

EDUC 314 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School

Designed to prepare teacher candidates in understanding PreK-8 elementary topics in mathematics, the teaching of these topics, and how children learn mathematics developmentally. Examines ways to reason mathematically, make connections, and communicate mathematics through the use of literature, manipulatives, technology, and classroom discourse. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated mathematics instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; Offered every spring; M. Warnsing

EDUC 315 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (1/2)

Designed for teacher candidates, this course coalesces theories of how people learn and practical experiences teaching science to children. Not intended to be a science content course, students will learn and practice pedagogy focused on the teaching and learning of science across several science content areas and elementary grade levels. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated science instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; Offered every spring;

EDUC 316 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (1/2)

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings needed to teach social studies in the elementary classroom. The class sessions will focus upon a comprehensive overview of the most effective approaches to planning, implementing, managing, and assessing successful social studies learning experiences for students. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated social studies instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; Offered every spring; Staff

EDUC 317 Curriculum Development and Teaching in the Middle Grades (1/2 or 1)

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for middle-level education. Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a practicum in the middle grades. Required for students seeking a middle school endorsement. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: English; B: Mathematics; C: Social Science; D: Science. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; Offered every spring; Staff

EDUC 318 Curriculum Development and Teaching in the Secondary School

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for secondary education. Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a 40-hour practicum in a high school. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: English; B: Mathematics; C: History; D: Political Science; E: Biology; F: Chemistry; G: Physics; H: Environmental Sciences; I: Psychology; J: Sociology. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 312 is taken concurrently; Offered every spring; S. DeWitt

EDUC 319 Curriculum Development and Teaching in Special Content Areas

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for teachers in art, music or languages (Spanish, French, Latin). Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a 40-hour practicum. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: Music; B: Visual Art; C: Language. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; Offered every spring; S. DeWitt; W. Parks

EDUC 321 Culturally Appropriate Teaching - The Navajo Reservation (1/2)

The classroom component of this course will examine the historical, sociological, cultural and educational circumstances of Navajos who have lived and are now living on the Navajo Nation Reservation in the Southwestern area of the U.S. Each August, students who have satisfactorily completed the classroom component of the course will travel with Knox professors to a remote school on the Navajo reservation. There, students and professors will work with the teachers currently employed by the school in grades K-6, assisting these teachers with professional development, instructional strategies, lesson planning, assessments, and curriculum development. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201, 202 or 203, 204, 301, 310, completion of or concurrent enrollment in EDUC 312, 314, 315, 316, or 318 or 319, and permission of instructor; Offered every spring; D. Beck

EDUC 323 Social and Emotional Learning Standards (1/2)

This course is a study of the Social and Emotional Learning Standards used in Illinois. This process will include how to use social awareness and interpersonal skills to establish and maintain positive relationships and how to demonstrate decision-making skills and responsible behaviors in personal, school, and community contexts. Students will develop the skills necessary to teach others how to achieve school and life success. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201, EDUC 204; Offered twice a year (generally fall and spring);

EDUC 325 Assessments, Tests & Measurements (1/2)

This course concentrates on the development of the ability to evaluate and interpret assessment tools in K-12 instructional settings. Topics include reliability and validity, social and ethical considerations of testing, summarizing and interpreting measurements, and the use of standardized tests, rating scales and observational scales. Special emphasis is given to the development of skills in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting the results of teacher-made educational assessment. Includes the principles of constructing and evaluating paper-and-pencil tests (objective and essay), rating scales, observational scales, and other non-paper-and-pencil techniques. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 204/PSYC 273; M. Lyons; M. Lei

EDUC 327 Special Education for Educators (1/2)

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of the role of special education within general education and their roles and responsibilities as instructional leaders for students with identified disabilities. Students will learn the process of how students are referred and identified and how services are decided upon and provided within the school. Students will also develop a foundation in legal issues and implications regarding current legislation as well as student and parental rights. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 301; Offered every spring; Staff

EDUC 330 American Educational Policy

The study of educational policy helps prepare you for taking up work in advocacy, leadership, academic research, and in your role as a citizen and/or teacher. In this course, we will think about the possibilities and the limits of education policy with special attention paid to how education policy often preserves oppressive structures even while it putatively attempts to mitigate their effects. We will think about what the aims of education policy should be; where policy comes from and how it is developed; who is involved and excluded from the decision making process; how schools are governed; how policy impacts the everyday lives of students and teachers; and how scholars have approached the study of education policy from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor; Offered every spring; D. Dougherty

EDUC 340 Student Teaching (3)

A full-time commitment to observation, reflection, and teaching in either a local school or a Chicago area school. Emphasis on exploring diverse approaches to teaching, curriculum, and evaluation and on using schools as sites for further inquiry and research. A weekly seminar accompanies the school-based field work. To participate, students must have successfully completed the teacher candidates content area exam required by the State of Illinois. Prerequisite(s): for Elementary Licensure: EDUC 310A, 312A, 314, 315, and 316; for Secondary Licensure: EDUC 310C, 312C, and 318; for Special Content Licensure: EDUC 310D, 312D, and 319; Offered fall and winter; IMMR; S/U; M. Lyons; D. O'Riley

EDUC 348 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff

EDUC 395 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Educational Studies not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

EDUC 399 Seminar: Issues in Education (1/2 or 1)

An intensive study of selected current issues in education. Students pursue topics related to the general issues and present their findings in the seminar group and/or in a research paper. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor; Staff

EDUC 400 Advanced Studies (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. Staff

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Printed on Friday, July 19, 2024