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Academics > Majors & Minors > Education

Courses

Contact

Joel Estes

Chair of Educational Studies

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7780

joestes@​knox.edu

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Requirements

Requirements for the major - Educational Studies, Elementary (currently grades 1-6)

11.5 credits as follows:

  • Introductory course: EDUC 201
  • Foundation courses: EDUC 202 or EDUC 203, EDUC 204, EDUC 208 (.5), EDUC 301, EDUC 310A
  • Methods courses: EDUC 312A, EDUC 314, EDUC 315(.5), EDUC 316(.5)
  • Student teaching: EDUC 340 (3 credits)

Note: EDUC 201, either EDUC 202 or EDUC 203, and EDUC 204 can be taken in any order, but all of these courses must be satisfactorily completed prior to enrolling in more advanced courses.

Requirements for the major - Educational Studies, Secondary (currently grades 6-12)

11.5 credits as follows:

  • Introductory course: EDUC 201
  • Foundation courses: EDUC 202 or EDUC 203, EDUC 204, EDUC 205, EDUC 208(.5), EDUC 301, EDUC 310C
  • Methods course: EDUC 312C, EDUC 318
  • Student Teaching: EDUC 340 (3 credits)

Requirements for the major - Educational Studies, Special Content Areas: Art(K-12), Music (K-12) and Language (K-12)

11.5 credits as follows:

  • Introductory course: EDUC 201
  • Foundation courses: EDUC 202 or EDUC 203, EDUC 204, EDUC 205, EDUC 208(.5), EDUC 301, EDUC 310D
  • Methods course: EDUC 312D, EDUC 319
  • Student Teaching: EDUC 340 (3 credits)

In general, a student may receive secondary certification by completing a major in Educational Studies, Secondary, and completing a major in the teaching area of interest. The subject areas in which Knox offers secondary education certifications are: English; mathematics; science with specific designations in chemistry, biology, environmental science or physics; and social science with specific designations in history, political science, psychology, or anthropology/sociology.

Requirements for the major - Social Science Education
This major can only be completed in conjunction with a major in Elementary or Secondary Educational Studies.

12 credits as follows:

  • Social Science Research: One from among: STAT 200 (see Non-Departmental Courses), HIST 285, or PS 230
  • Anthropology/Sociology: ANSO 102, ANSO 103, or ANSO 105
  • Economics: ECON 110 and ECON 120
  • Geography: One from among: ANSO 231, IIS 100, ENVS 101 or ENVS 260
  • History: Four courses: HIST 160, HIST 161, one 100-level European (non-U.S.) history course, and one World (non-U.S., non-European) history course
  • Political Science: PS 101, and either PS 210 or PS 220
  • Psychology: One from among: PSYC 100, PSYC 203, PSYC 205, or PSYC 207
  • Educational Studies: EDUC 310, and either (EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316) or EDUC 318

As a member of the Associated Colleges of Illinois, the Educational Studies Department participates in a number of programs focused on preparing teachers for high needs schools. For example, majors in the Educational Studies Department have the opportunity to serve as interns during a summer school program for first through twelfth grade students from Chicago Public Schools or work in the Knox College4Kids, a summer enrichment program for children in first through eighth grade. The interns teach their own group of students while completing professional development activities. Teacher candidates can also work with Knox College faculty and area master teachers at Knox College. The Educational Studies Department also offers a course in culturally appropriate teaching which culminates in a teaching residency on the Navajo Nation Reservation during the summer.

Majoring in Educational Studies without Certification

Students who are unable to complete student teaching or students who complete the upper level methods courses but no longer wish to pursue initial licensure must meet with the department chair to discuss appropriate course substitutions for completion of an Educational Studies without Certification major. The substitutions must include three credits at the 300 level chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students who do not complete the entire Educational Studies Teacher Certification Program will not be recommended for certification by Knox College.

Requirements for the minor - Educational Policy Studies

5 credits as follows:

  • Foundation courses: Two from: EDUC 201, 202, 203, 204
  • Political Science Foundations: One from PS 101, 135
  • American Public Policy: Two from: PS 234, 241, 305, 307, 311, EDUC 330

Course Descriptions

EDUC 201. School and Society. (1)

Acquaints students with the forces that have shaped the formation of American public education and explores the social context of which schools are a part. The relationships between the school and the wider social, political, economic, and cultural forces are explored. Course includes 20 hours of service at a local social service agency. HSS; Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year, first-term students; Cross Listing: ANSO 201; DV; Offered every term; J. Estes; B. Swanson; N. Williams; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 202. History of Education. (1)

An examination of the ways in which humans across time have addressed issues such as educational aims, opportunity, curriculum and pedagogy. The relationship between socio-political contexts and education, the trends and processes of educational change, and linkages between past and current educational practices are also considered. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: HIST 202; W; Offered every other term (FA, SP, WI, FA, SP, WI); B. Swanson; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 203. Philosophy of Education. (1)

A critical examination of some assumptions about education embraced by historical and contemporary philosophers, and relevance of these assumptions to U.S. schooling. Philosophical questions are considered, such as "What does it mean to teach?" and "What is knowledge?" HUM; Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: PHIL 215; W; Offered every other term (FA, SP, WI, FA, SP, WI); B. Swanson; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 204. Psychological Foundations of Education. (1)

An examination of human learning from a variety of perspectives. Learning is viewed as a process that occurs formally in settings such as schools, as well as informally in daily human experience. Where appropriate, topics in human development are related to theories of learning. In addition to class work, students work in local classrooms for a minimum of 25 hours. In 2017/18 this course will be taught at Lombard Middle School located at 1220 E Knox Street in Galesburg. The 25 hours and the course will be completed between Knox periods 3s and 5s. Advisor note: public transportation is available for students without transportation. If a student has reliable transportation they may still register for a 6th period class. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: PSYC 273; O; Offered every term; D. Beck; N. Williams;

EDUC 205. Adolescent Development. (1)

This course is an examination of emerging adolescent development, both historically and in contemporary society. It is designed to focus on the physical, psycho-social and intellectual dimensions of early adolescent development. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 204; Cross Listing: PSYC 206; Offered every term; D. Beck; E. Dickens; N. Williams;

EDUC 207. Technology in the Classroom. (1/2)

Educators focus on how to use personal computer systems effectively within educational contexts. The course not only examines specific computer applications that are being used or could be used by educators but also the implications and ramifications of increasing the use of technology, specifically computer technology, on learning and teaching. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201; Offered fall and spring terms; E. Dickens;

EDUC 208. Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum. (1/2)

This course focuses on the uses of writing and reading as ways to learn across the curriculum. Educators interested in elementary through high school instruction, in all content areas, will learn about ways to set up a classroom, assess student readiness levels, analyze this assessment, and plan instruction to maximize student learning. Reading and writing strategies students can use will also be examined. Offered fall and spring; E. Dickens;

EDUC 209. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. (1/2)

Students develop strategies- fully grounded in research and practice- to teach English as a second language (ESL) in the United States or to teach English as a foreign language (EFL) internationally. The course will focus upon second language assessment, second language teaching methodologies, and ESL/EFL materials development and curriculum design. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201; Offered winter term; E. Dickens;

EDUC 248. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

EDUC 295. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Educational Studies not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

EDUC 301. Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World. (1)

This course will focus on teaching children with diverse needs, including children with identified physical and emotional handicapping conditions, as well as those from non-dominant groups by virtue of their race, ethnicity, nation of origin, language, religion, economic history, gender and/or sexual orientation. Legislation and rights and responsibilities of teachers will be addressed, as will fostering working relationships with students' parents and the community beyond the school. Minimum of 25 hours of fieldwork required. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of the Test of Academic Proficiency required by the State of Illinois, EDUC 201, EDUC 202 or 203, and EDUC 204, or permission of the instructor; DV; Offered fall and winter; S. DeWitt; N. Williams;

EDUC 310. Perspectives on Curriculum. (1)

This course focuses on the theories and practices utilized in planning and executing curriculum, including the crafting and delivering instruction, classroom and behavioral management, and various approaches to assessment with particular focus on differentiation and lesson and unit planning. Includes in-depth investigation of quality curriculum including a review of contemporary approaches and modification of these for a range of learners. Students enrolled in the course are responsible for completing a practicum experience. A: Elementary; B: Middle Grades; C: Secondary; D: Special Content Area. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 301; W; Offered every winter; B. Swanson; E. Dickens;

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EDUC 312. Teaching Reading/Language Arts. (1)

Reading and writing are predicated on teachers providing students with a solid grounding in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction. Theoretical foundations of understanding how children learn to read and write will be explored. Effective reading instruction hinges on an awareness of the language development of each individual student and the language content of the text. This course deals with how students learn to read and the content of reading. Attention shifts from "learning to read" to "reading to learn", and from working with small groups to effective differentiation needed to work with entire classrooms of children. A: Elementary Grades; B: Middle Grades; C: Secondary; D: Special Content Area. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; Offered every spring; D. Estes; J. Estes; S. Hinman;

EDUC 314. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School. (1)

Designed to prepare teacher candidates in understanding PreK-8 elementary topics in mathematics, the teaching of these topics, and how children learn mathematics developmentally. Examines ways to reason mathematically, make connections, and communicate mathematics through the use of literature, manipulatives, technology, and classroom discourse. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated mathematics instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; O; Offered every spring; J. Foubert;

EDUC 315. Teaching Science in the Elementary School. (1/2)

Designed for teacher candidates, this course coalesces theories of how people learn and practical experiences teaching science to children. Not intended to be a science content course, rather, students will learn and practice pedagogy focused on the teaching and learning of science across several science content areas and elementary grade levels. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated science instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; O; Offered every spring; J. Foubert;

EDUC 316. Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School. (1/2)

This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and understandings needed to teach social studies in the elementary classroom. The class sessions will focus upon a comprehensive overview of the most effective approaches to planning, implementing, managing, and assessing successful social studies learning experiences for students. Emphasis is placed upon the design, implementation, and assessment of differentiated social studies instruction in the PreK-8 classroom. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; EDUC 314, EDUC 315, and EDUC 316 are taken concurrently; O; Offered every spring; D. Beck; J. Estes;

EDUC 317. Curriculum Development and Teaching in the Middle Grades. (1)

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for middle-level education. Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a practicum in the middle grades. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: English; B: Mathematics; C: Social Science; D: Science. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; Offered every spring; B. Swanson; E. Dickens; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 318. Curriculum Development and Teaching in the Secondary School. (1)

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for secondary education. Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a practicum in a high school. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: English; B: Mathematics; C: History; D: Political Science; E: Biology; F: Chemistry; G: Physics; H: Environmental Sciences. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; O; Offered every spring; B. Swanson; E. Dickens; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 319. Curriculum Development and Teaching in Special Content Areas. (1)

A continuation of the work introduced in EDUC 310 with specific emphasis on instructional planning and delivery, assessment, differentiation, and classroom management appropriate for teachers in art, music or languages (Spanish, French, Latin). Provides an opportunity for advanced study and application of principles and issues central to appropriate instruction of each learner. Students must complete a practicum. Separate sections apply specific content and assessment techniques appropriate to needs of the program. A: Music; B: Visual Art; C: Language. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 310; O; Offered every spring; B. Swanson; E. Dickens; S. DeWitt;

EDUC 321. Culturally Appropriate Teaching - The Navajo Reservation. (1/2)

The classroom component of this course will examine the historical, sociological, cultural and educational circumstances of Navajos who have lived and are now living on the Navajo Nation Reservation in the Southwestern area of the U.S. Each August, students who have satisfactorily completed the classroom component of the course will travel with Knox professors to a remote school on the Navajo reservation. There, students and professors will work with the teachers currently employed by the school in grades K-6, assisting these teachers with professional development, instructional strategies, lesson planning, assessments, and curriculum development. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201, 202 or 203, 204, 301, 310, completion of or concurrent enrollment in EDUC 312, 314, 315, 316, or 318 or 319, and permission of instructor; Offered every spring; D. Beck;

EDUC 323. Social and Emotional Learning Standards. (1/2)

This course is a study of the Social and Emotional Learning Standards used in Illinois. This process will include how to use social awareness and interpersonal skills to establish and maintain positive relationships and how to demonstrate decision-making skills and responsible behaviors in personal, school, and community contexts. Students will develop the skills necessary to teach others how to achieve school and life success. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 201, EDUC 204; Offered winter and spring; D. Beck;

EDUC 325. Assessments, Tests & Measurements. (1/2)

This course concentrates on the development of the ability to evaluate and interpret assessment tools in K-12 instructional settings. Topics include reliability and validity, social and ethical considerations of testing, summarizing and interpreting measurements, and the use of standardized tests, rating scales and observational scales. Special emphasis is given to the development of skills in constructing, evaluating, and interpreting the results of teacher-made educational assessment. Includes the principles of constructing and evaluating paper-and-pencil tests (objective and essay), rating scales, observational scales, and other non-paper-and-pencil techniques. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 204/PSYC 273; D. Beck;

EDUC 327. Special Education for Educators. (1/2)

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of the role of special education within general education and their roles and responsibilities as instructional leaders for students with identified disabilities. Students will learn the process of how students are referred and identified and how services are decided upon and provided within the school. Students will also develop a foundation in legal issues and implications regarding current legislation as well as student and parental rights. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 301; Offered every spring; K. Deschamps;

EDUC 330. American Educational Policy. (1)

This course provides students the opportunity to examine issues in American educational policy-making and implementation from three interrelated perspectives. First, students will develop a framework from which to understand the rationale and necessity of developing large-scale policies for the education of a citizenry or specific group. Second, these perspectives will be used to consider specific policies constructed and implemented in a variety of educational contexts (e.g., public schooling, higher education, adult education and vocational education). Finally, the effects of educational policy upon their intended constituencies (e.g. reforms) will be examined. Prerequisite(s): Two of: EDUC 201, 202, or 203; and one of: EDUC 204 or 301; and PS 235; or permission of the instructor; Offered every spring; E. Dickens; N. Williams; B. Arthur;

EDUC 340. Student Teaching. (3)

A full-time commitment to observation, reflection, and teaching in either a local school or a Chicago area school. Emphasis on exploring diverse approaches to teaching, curriculum, and evaluation and on using schools as sites for further inquiry and research. A weekly seminar accompanies the school-based field work. To participate, students must have successfully completed the teacher candidates content area exam required by the State of Illinois. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 312 and 314, 315, 316, or EDUC 318, or EDUC 319; Offered fall and winter; Staff;

EDUC 348. Teaching Assistant. (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; May be graded S/U at instructor's discretion; Staff;

EDUC 395. Special Topics. (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Educational Studies not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff;

EDUC 399. Seminar: Issues in Education. (1)

An intensive study of selected current issues in education. Students pursue topics related to the general issues and present their findings in the seminar group and/or in a research paper. Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor; Staff;

EDUC 400. Advanced Studies. (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. Staff;

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