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Professor Stuart Allison checks the wind with a student before the annual Green Oaks Prairie Burn.

Courses

Department Chair

James Mountjoy

Associate Professor and Chair of Biology

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7086

jmountjo@​knox.edu

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Ford Center for the Fine Arts

BIOL 110 Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity

An introduction to the study of biological diversity in an evolutionary and ecological context. This course will examine the characteristics and adaptations of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants and animals, and how they have evolved. Related topics include population genetics, evolutionary processes and their results (including adaptation, speciation, and extinction), and ecological factors that influence the distribution and abundance of organisms, as well as the interactions among species in nature. Models of biodiversity and the factors that affect it will also be addressed. NPS; SI; Offered every fall term; J. Mountjoy; J. Templeton

BIOL 110S , 120S, 103S Supplemental Instruction in Biology (1/2)

BIOL 110S, 120S, and 130S are reserved exclusively for students who are simultaneously enrolled in BIOL 110, 120, or 130. Course content will be determined by the difficulties that students encounter in the primary course. Prerequisite(s): Co-enrollment in BIOL 110, 120, or 130 and permission of the instructor; Staff

BIOL 120 Cell Biology and Physiology

The cell is the building block of all organisms. This course begins with an examination of the dynamic relationship between cellular structure and function. An understanding of this relationship at the cellular and molecular level then forms the basis for understanding physiological processes at the tissue, organ, and organ system level. Emphasis is placed on how organisms maintain homeostasis via physiological processes with relevant examples from both plant and animal kingdoms. NPS; SI; Offered every winter term; S. Allison; E. Penick

BIOL 130 Molecular Biology and Genetics

This course will cover the creation, manipulation and modification of genes. We will cover Mendelian and molecular genetics and the central dogma of molecular biology - DNA replication, transcription and translation. Laboratory exercises will be used to illustrate principles and processes, and to develop bench skills and familiarity with the scientific method. NPS; SI; Offered every spring term; J. Thorn; M. Jones-Rhoades

BIOL 210 Introduction to Research

In this course, students develop the skills required to do scientific research, and gain an understanding of how knowledge within the natural sciences is accumulated. Through active participation in research, students explore the fundamental concepts involved in the scientific method and develop proficiency in all aspects of conducting a research project from the initial formulation of a hypothesis through to the presentation of results. Topics covered include experimental design, data analysis and presentation, conducting literature searches, writing scientific research papers, and giving scientific talks and posters. Prerequisite(s): two from BIOL 110, BIOL 120, and BIOL 130; O; W; Offered every term; Staff

BIOL 212 Human-Animal Relationships

Animals have played important roles in the lives of humans from prehistoric times to the present day; they are our friends, our foes, and our food. This seminar-style course examines various aspects of the history, biology, and culture of human-animal relationships, with a focus on canines and felines. Students are responsible for participating in discussions of readings and films, and for presenting their research on various topics including the evolution of domestication, animals in art and literature, animal welfare, and the human-animal bond. Guest speakers and field trips enhance these discussions. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing; Cross Listing: IDIS 212; Not open to students having credit for PREC 127; Offered occasionally; J. Templeton

BIOL 248 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; Graded S/U; Staff

BIOL 255 Internship (1/2 or 1)

Students interested in working and learning with an off-campus organization in fields related to biology may do so for credit. Typically a biology faculty member supervises the internship and in consultation the off-campus supervisor and student determines meeting times and assignments. Additional information about internships is available through the Career Development Center. May be taken A-F or S/U. Depending on the specific nature of the internship, the faculty member determines whether the internship is graded S-U or A-F; Staff

BIOL 281 Nutrition and Metabolism

The essentials of human nutrition are covered. Topics include human nutritional requirements, composition of foodstuffs, anatomy of the digestive tract, digestive enzymes, absorption and degradation of nutrients, and synthesis of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Three periods lecture, one period laboratory. Alternate years. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 100A or CHEM 100 or permission of the instructor; Staff

BIOL 295 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Biology not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

BIOL 295B

BIOL 312 Animal Behavior

This course examines the mechanisms and functions of behavior. Topics include the neural basis and organization of behavior, behavioral development, behavioral genetics, the causation of behavior, the evolution of behavior, behavioral ecology and sociobiology. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and either BIOL 210, PSYC 281, or STAT 200; Cross Listing: PSYC 312; Offered every year, usually in the spring term; J. Templeton

BIOL 314 Ornithology

This course explores the characteristics and evolution of birds and examines many areas of biology such as systematics, behavior, ecology and conservation biology using avian examples. Labs introduce students to the diversity of birds through examination of specimens of birds from around the world as well as during field trips to view a cross-section of Illinois' avifauna. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: ENVS 314; Usually offered alternate years in spring term; J. Mountjoy

BIOL 316 Field Botany

An examination of the ecology, evolution, and systematics of vascular plants. Emphasis is on the evolutionary relationships and natural history of the flora of Illinois. Extensive laboratory and field work introduce students to methods of plant identification, taxonomy, and botanical field studies. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Offered in alternate years; S. Allison

BIOL 317 Principles of Ecology

This course examines the interrelationships between living organisms and the physical and biological factors that surround them. Ecological principles at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem are considered. Includes both laboratory and field experiments. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: ENVS 317; Offered in alternate years; S. Allison

BIOL 318 Evolution

This course provides a detailed examination of evolution by natural selection, the central theory in the study of biology. The material covers a broad range of evolutionary ideas, including the development of Darwin's theory; the modification and elaboration of that theory via the modern synthesis and current theories of how evolution works; the evidence for evolution; evolutionary processes at the molecular, organismal, behavioral, and ecological levels; patterns of speciation and macro-evolutionary change; the evolution of sex; and sexual selection. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Offered alternate years, usually in winter term; J. Mountjoy

BIOL 319 Conservation Biology

This course examines a dynamic and rapidly developing field. Conservation biology is the study of factors which influence both the diversity and scarcity of species. In particular, we concentrate on how human activities influence global biodiversity. We also discuss local biodiversity. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: ENVS 319; Offered in alternate years; S. Allison

BIOL 320 Ethnobotany

Ethnobotany is the study of the interactions of plants and people, including the influence of plants on human culture. In this course, we examine the properties of plants used for food, fiber, and medicine. We examine how plants are used in developed nations and by indigenous peoples. We focus on ethnobotanically important local native plants in labs and in term papers. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 and BIOL 120 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: ENVS 320; Offered in alternate years; S. Allison

BIOL 321 Biology of Fishes

Fish are astoundingly diverse - 33,000 species - over half of vertebrate diversity exists in this group. Despite this diversity, most of us are familiar with just a tiny fraction of the species (e.g. tuna, great white shark, largemouth bass, etc.) and a miniscule proportion of its anatomical diversity. In Biology of Fishes, we will dissect a wide range of fishes of all shapes and sizes, focusing on comparative approaches to understanding functional implications of diversity. We will ask questions such as "why is the mouth of a bass so large whereas a sunfish has a tiny mouth, given their close evolutionary relationships?" and "why are tuna shaped like raindrops?" Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 210 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing: ENVS 311; Usually offered alternate years in Winter term; N. Gidmark

BIOL 325 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

The functional and evolutionary rationale of vertebrate anatomy is discussed, and comparisons between different taxa are drawn. Mammalian functional anatomy is emphasized. The laboratory deals with dissections of several vertebrate species, drawing functional comparisons between the muscular, circulatory, nervous, visceral and skeletal systems of each. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Offered annually in Fall term; N. Gidmark

BIOL 326 Field Marine Anatomy (1/2)

In this course, we will explore extreme anatomy that can be observed in ocean-going vertebrates. From Monkfish to mackerel to seals to dolphins, many of the animals with the strangest shapes occur in the ocean, and yet typical on-campus courses such as Biology of Fishes and Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy do not have the opportunity to truly explore these fascinating animals. In this off-campus experience, we will stay on an island-based marine lab in the Atlantic Ocean and dissect likely dozens of marine animals, including necropsy experiences with seals, dolphins, and sea turtles. Through dissection and description, we will explore these fascinating biological forms. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 321 or 325 or permission of the instructor; Offered every year; N. Gidmark

BIOL 328 Physiology

In this course we have the goal of understanding how all animals work, from basic biochemical building blocks to a breathing, eating, sweating, jumping, integrated organism. We explore how the diversity of animals on Earth work differently, solving the same problems & constraints in various ways. The course focuses on metabolism, muscle function & control, oxygen & gas exchange, thermal regime (e.g. ectotherms versus endotherms), and salt/water balance. We rely on core principles in physics & chemistry to understand the effect of the environment and evolutionary history on physiological function through experiments, primary literature review, and empirical data. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Offered every year in Spring term; N. Gidmark

BIOL 329 Histology

The main objective is to provide students with a knowledge of the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of the vertebrate body and with the basic techniques for preparing tissues for examination with the light microscope. Emphasis is on relating structure to function. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and BIOL 130; Offered occasionally; Staff

BIOL 331 Genomics and Bioinformatics

This course explores the composition and organization of genomes across different organisms, the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped genomes, and computational tools used to analyze genomes and other large datasets in biology. Emphasis is placed on development of bioinformatic research skills, including the ability to write novel computational tools. QSR; Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 or permission of the instructor; QR; Usually offered in two years out of three; M. Jones-Rhoades

BIOL 332 Molecular Biology

Gene structure, expression, replication, and recombination are the central focus of this course. Lab activities are centered on genetic engineering strategies and genomics (computer analysis of gene sequences). Three periods lecture and one period laboratory. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 and either CHEM 100 or CHEM 100A, or permission of the instructor; Usually offered in two years out of three; M. Jones-Rhoades

BIOL 333 Microbiology

This course explores the structure, metabolism, genetics, and genomics of prokaryotes and viruses. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the basic cellular and molecular biology of microbes impacts phenomena such as resistance to antibiotics and interactions between pathogens and the human defense system. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 and 210 or permission of the instructor; Usually offered in two years out of three; M. Jones-Rhoades

BIOL 335 Genetics

This course examines the mechanisms behind genetic inheritance, mutation and recombination in a range of model organisms and in humans. The course is discussion-focused, with an emphasis on critical analysis of the primary literature. Topics will include landmark experiments that have shaped our understanding of the field and modern techniques of genetic analysis. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 and 210. Junior standing may be substituted for BIOL 210; Offered in alternate years; M. Jones-Rhoades

BIOL 338 Developmental Biology

How does the fertilized egg give rise to the adult body? This is the focus of developmental biology. This course examines many important concepts in development, including determination of cell fate, embryo patterning and the processes of forming specialized organs and tissues. We also explore the connections between evolution and development. The course and laboratory are problem-based and investigative. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 130 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; Usually offered in two years out of three; J. Thorn

BIOL 342 Electron Microscopy

Principles and techniques used in electron microscopy and its role in studying organisms at the cellular level are studied. This course format is project-oriented and includes routine and special preparation of cells and tissues for the transmission and scanning electron microscopes, photographic techniques and the interpretation of electron micrographs. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 329 or permission of the instructor; Enrollment limited to 10 students; Offered occasionally; Staff

BIOL 343 Behavioral Ecology

Behavioral ecology examines the adaptive value of behavioral traits - how these traits enhance survival and reproductive success of individuals in the ecological and social environments in which they evolved. Discussions of the primary literature will be used to generate new research questions, and experiments and field studies will be designed to answer those questions. The resulting data will be analyzed and the findings presented orally and in scientific papers. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 210 and BIOL 312 or permission of the instructor; Offered occasionally; J. Mountjoy; J. Templeton

BIOL 348 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; Graded S/U; Staff

BIOL 380 Senior Research Seminar (1/2 or 1)

This course is required in order to fulfill the research requirement for the Biology major. In the seminar students will find a mentor whose interests and expertise match those of the student and cover topics related to the successful completion of the research project. This course is part of a two-term sequence. In the second course, students will undertake an original research project, either laboratory or library based (BIOL 381-384) culminating in both a written and oral presentation. Students undertaking an Honors project are exempt from the 380 course sequence. Prerequisite(s): senior standing or permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Offered every term; Staff

BIOL 381 Research: Populations (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): At least one course from BIOL 310-319 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credits; W; Offered every term; Staff

BIOL 382 Research: Organisms (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): at least one course from BIOL 320-BIOL 329 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 383 Research: Cells and Molecules (1/2 or 1)

Prerequisite(s): at least one course from BIOL 330-339 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 384 Research: Education (1/2 or 1)

Students who are completing K through 12 education credentials along with their biology major may elect to fulfill the research requirement for their biology major by undertaking a research project directly related to secondary education in biology. Typically this takes the form of designing innovative curricula. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110, BIOL 120, BIOL 130, BIOL 210, one 300-level Biology course and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 395 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)

Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Biology not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

BIOL 400 Advanced Studies (1/2 or 1)

See College Honors Program. Staff

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Printed on Monday, July 22, 2019