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Course Descriptions

BIOL 101 General Biology (1)
This course is an introduction to biological principles for those students who are not majoring in Biology. Emphasis is placed on understanding how organisms sense, respond to, and survive in their environments. Examples from bacterial, plant, and animal kingdoms are presented in both lab and lecture to reinforce how all life is interconnected. Human diseases and their causes are also covered. This course covers many content areas required for teacher certification.MNS; NPS; Staff

BIOL 110 Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity (1)
An introduction to the study of biological diversity in an evolutionary and ecological context. This course will examine the characteristics and adaptations of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants and animals, and how they have evolved. Related topics include population genetics, evolutionary processes and their results (including adaptation, speciation, and extinction), and ecological factors that influence the distribution and abundance of organisms, as well as the interactions among species in nature. Models of biodiversity and the factors that affect it will also be addressed.MNS; NPS; J.Mountjoy; J.Templeton;

BIOL 120 Cell Biology and Physiology (1)
The cell is the building block of all organisms. This course begins with an examination of the dynamic relationship between cellular structure and function. An understanding of this relationship at the cellular and molecular level then forms the basis for understanding physiological processes at the tissue, organ, and organ system level. Emphasis is placed on how organisms maintain homeostasis via physiological processes with relevant examples from both plant and animal kingdoms.MNS; NPS; S.Allison; E.Penick;

BIOL 130 Molecular Biology and Genetics (1)
This course will cover the creation, manipulation and modification of genes. We will cover Mendelian and molecular genetics and the central dogma of molecular biology - DNA replication, transcription and translation. Laboratory exercises will be used to illustrate principles and processes, and to develop bench skills and familiarity with the scientific method.MNS; NPS; J.Thorn; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 150 Human Genetics (1)
Classical and molecular genetics as applied to humans are surveyed in this course for non-majors. Human reproduction and the segregation of traits are covered. Genetic diseases that are due to enzyme defects and chromosomal abnormalities are illustrated, and the application of molecular biology methods to cure diseases are discussed. Gene function and the genetics of cancer, as well as current issues in genetics research, are also included. MNS; J.Thorn;

BIOL 160 Plants (1)
This course is intended to introduce students to the world of plants. Humans and virtually every other living thing depend upon plants for their basic sustenance and for maintaining the environment in which we all live. We will study the origin of plant life, methods of identifying plants in nature, diversity of plant form, their internal and external structures, how plants function, and the interaction of plants with their environment and human society. This course is also designed to teach students to think like a scientist and to conduct studies in plant science and provide them with a new appreciation for plants and ways to see the details in nature. MNS; NPS; Cross Listing : ENVS 160; S.Allison;

BIOL 201 Contemporary Biological Issues (1)
This course is designed for both science and non-science majors and explores the biological, political, and social ramifications of contemporary controversial biological issues. Alternate years. MNS; Prereq : Sophomore standing; Cross Listing : ENVS 201; L.Dybas;

BIOL 210 Introduction to Research (1)
In this course, students develop the skills required to do scientific research, and gain an understanding of how knowledge within the natural sciences is accumulated. Through active participation in research, students explore the fundamental concepts involved in the scientific method and develop proficiency in all aspects of conducting a research project from the initial formulation of a hypothesis through to the presentation of results. Topics covered include experimental design, data analysis and presentation, conducting literature searches, writing scientific research papers, and giving scientific talks and posters. Prereq : two from BIOL 110, BIOL 120, and BIOL 130; O; W; Staff

BIOL 212 Human-Animal Relationships (1)
Animals have played important roles in the lives of humans from prehistoric times to the present day; they are our friends, our foes, and our food. This seminar-style course examines various aspects of the history, biology, and culture of human-animal relationships. Students are responsible for participating in discussions of readings and films, and for presenting their research on various topics including the evolution of domestication, methods of ritual and standard slaughter, vivisection and animal welfare, and the human-animal bond. Guest speakers and field trips enhance these discussions. Prereq : Sophomore standing; Not open to students having credit for PREC 127; J.Templeton;

BIOL 248 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)
Prereq : Permission of instructor; Graded S/U; Staff

BIOL 255 Internship (1/2 or 1)
Students interested in working and learning with an off-campus organization in fields related to biology may do so for credit. Typically a biology faculty member supervises the internship and in consultation the off-campus supervisor and student determines meeting times and assignments. Additional information about internships is available through the Career Development Center. May be taken A-F or S/U.Depending on the specific nature of the internship, the faculty member determines whether the internship is graded S-U or A-F; Staff

BIOL 281 Nutrition and Metabolism (1)
The essentials of human nutrition are covered. Topics include human nutritional requirements, composition of foodstuffs, anatomy of the digestive tract, digestive enzymes, absorption and degradation of nutrients, and synthesis of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Three periods lecture, one period laboratory. Alternate years. Prereq : CHEM 101 or permission of the instructor; Staff

BIOL 295 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)
Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Biology not covered in the usual curriculum. Staff

BIOL 311A Marine Biology - Field Research on the Belizean Barrier Reef (1)
In this course we cover the basic concepts of marine biology. In addition to the 10-week course on the Knox campus there is an optional 2-week field component for an additional .5 credit on Tobacco Caye, Belize. The instruction is motivated by the trip to Belize, therefore the specific examples of tropical marine ecosystems we study-coral reef, sea grass, mangrove, and coastal communities-are those found there. Belizean history, culture, and government, with emphasis on the environmental issues that have become a priority in the Belizean development agenda are also course topics. On Tobacco Caye, students will have the opportunity to participate in faculty guided research experiences. Alternate years.MNS; Cross Listing : ENVS 312A; L.Dybas;

BIOL 311B Field Research on the Belizean Barrier Reef (1/2)
Two-week field component of BIOL 311A/ENVS 312A on Tobacco Caye, Belize. Alternate years.MNS; Cross Listing : ENVS 312B; L.Dybas;

BIOL 312 Animal Behavior (1)
This course examines the mechanisms and functions of behavior. Topics include the neural basis and organization of behavior, behavioral development, behavioral genetics, the causation of behavior, the evolution of behavior, behavioral ecology and sociobiology. Prereq : BIOL 110 and either BIOL 210, PSYC 281, or STAT 200; Cross Listing : PSYC 312; J.Templeton;

BIOL 314 Ornithology (1)
This course explores the characteristics and evolution of birds and examines many areas of biology such as systematics, behavior, ecology and conservation biology using avian examples. Labs introduce students to the diversity of birds through examination of specimens of birds from around the world as well as during field trips to view a cross-section of Illinois' avifauna. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing : ENVS 314; J.Mountjoy;

BIOL 316 Field Biology of Higher Plants (1)
An examination of the ecology, evolution, and systematics of higher plants. Emphasis is on the evolutionary relationships and natural history of the flora of Illinois. Extensive laboratory and field work introduce students to methods of plant identification, taxonomy, and botanical field studies. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110 and BIOL 210; or permission of the instructor; S.Allison;

BIOL 317 Principles of Ecology (1)
This course examines the interrelationships between living organisms and the physical and biological factors that surround them. Ecological principles at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem are considered. Includes both laboratory and field experiments. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110 and BIOL 210; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing : ENVS 317; S.Allison;

BIOL 318 Evolution (1)
This course provides a detailed examination of evolution by natural selection, the central theory in the study of biology. The material covers a broad range of evolutionary ideas, including the development of Darwin's theory; the modification and elaboration of that theory via the modern synthesis and current theories of how evolution works; the evidence for evolution; evolutionary processes at the molecular, organismal, behavioral, and ecological levels; patterns of speciation and macro-evolutionary change; the evolution of sex; and sexual selection. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110 and BIOL 210; or permission of the instructor; J.Mountjoy;

BIOL 319 Conservation Biology (1)
This course examines a dynamic and rapidly developing field. Conservation biology is the study of factors which influence both the diversity and scarcity of species. In particular, we concentrate on how human activities influence global biodiversity. We also discuss local biodiversity. Prereq : BIOL 110 or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing : ENVS 319; S.Allison;

BIOL 320 Ethnobotany (1)
Ethnobotany is the study of the interactions of plants and people, including the influence of plants on human culture. In this course, we examine the properties of plants used for food, fiber, and medicine. We examine how plants are used in developed nations and by indigenous peoples. We focus on ethnobotanically important local native plants in labs and in term papers. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110 and BIOL 120; or permission of the instructor; Cross Listing : ENVS 320; S.Allison;

BIOL 322 Invertebrate Biology (1)
Invertebrate diversity, form, and function. Through a phylogenetic approach, all of the major phyla are considered. Both terrestrial and aquatic forms and their ecology are included. Saltwater aquariums in the Umbeck Center furnish live marine forms for laboratory study. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 110, BIOL 120, BIOL 130, and BIOL 210; Cross Listing : ENVS 322; L.Dybas;

BIOL 325 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (1)
The functional and evolutionary rationale of vertebrate anatomy is discussed, and comparisons between different taxa are drawn. Mammalian functional anatomy is emphasized. The laboratory deals with dissections of several vertebrate species, drawing functional comparisons between the muscular, circulatory, nervous, visceral and skeletal systems of each. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 120, BIOL 210, or permission of the instructor; Staff

BIOL 328 Physiology (1)
The biology of animal respiratory, circulatory, immune, digestive, nervous, sensory, renal, muscle and skeletal systems is developed into an integrative model of how the body works. The course and laboratory are problem based and investigative. Prereq : BIOL 120 and BIOL 210; or permission of the instructor; J.Thorn;

BIOL 329 Histology (1)
The main objective is to provide students with a knowledge of the microscope anatomy of the tissues and organs of the vertebrate body and with the basic techniques for preparing tissues for examination with the light microscope. Emphasis is on relating structure to function. Prereq : BIOL 120 and BIOL 130; L.Dybas;

BIOL 332 Molecular Biology (1)
Gene structure, expression, replication, and recombination are the central focus of this course. Lab activities are centered on genetic engineering strategies and genomics (computer analysis of gene sequences). Three periods lecture and one period laboratory. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 130 and CHEM 101, or permission of the instructor; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 333 Microbiology (1)
This course explores the structure, metabolism, genetics, and genomics of prokaryotes and viruses. Emphasis is placed on understanding how the basic cellular and molecular biology of microbes impacts phenomena such as resistance to antibiotics and interactions between pathogens and the human defense system. Prereq : BIOL 130 and 210, or permission of the instructor; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 335 Genetics (1)
This course examines the mechanisms behind genetic inheritance, mutation and recombination in a range of model organisms and in humans. The course is discussion-focused, with an emphasis on critical analysis of the primary literature. Topics will include landmark experiments that have shaped our understanding of the field and modern techniques of genetic analysis. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 130 and 210. Junior standing may be substituted for BIOL 210; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 336 Physiology and Anatomy of Vascular Plants (1)
Anatomical features and physiological processes that underlie the structure and function of leaves, shoots, roots and flowers are presented to build an integrative model of how plants work. Emphasis is placed on how plants respond to the environment. The laboratory is project-based and investigative. Prereq : BIOL 130 and BIOL 210; or permission of the instructor; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 338 Developmental Biology (1)
How does the fertilized egg give rise to the adult body? This is the focus of developmental biology. This course examines many important concepts in development, including determination of cell fate, embryo patterning and the processes of forming specialized organs and tissues. We also explore the connections between evolution and development. The course and laboratory are problem-based and investigative. Prereq : BIOL 130 and BIOL 210 or permission of the instructor; J.Thorn;

BIOL 341 Methods of Field Biology (1)
This course provides an introduction to research methods in field biology, focusing on local species and habitats. Topics include species identification, field techniques, data analysis and scientific writing. Students design and conduct experiments individually or in groups. Prereq : BIOL 210, and one course from BIOL 312-BIOL 319; Cross Listing : ENVS 341; S.Allison;

BIOL 342 Electron Microscopy (1)
Principles and techniques used in electron microscopy and its role in studying organisms at the cellular level are studied. This course format is project-oriented and includes routine and special preparation of cells and tissues for the transmission and scanning electron microscopes, photographic techniques and the interpretation of electron micrographs. Prereq : BIOL 329 or permission of the instructor; Enrollment limited to 10 students; L.Dybas;

BIOL 343 Behavioral Ecology (1)
Behavioral ecology examines the adaptive value of behavioral traits - how these traits enhance survival and reproductive success of individuals in the ecological and social environments in which they evolved. Discussions of the primary literature will be used to generate new research questions, and experiments and field studies will be designed to answer those questions. The resulting data will be analyzed and the findings presented orally and in scientific papers. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 210 and BIOL 312, or permission of the instructor; J.Mountjoy; J.Templeton;

BIOL 344 Advanced Microbiology (1)
The primary emphasis of this course is experimental investigation of microbial ecology, bacterial growth, enzyme kinetics, mutation rates and bioassays using bacteria and yeasts. Alternate years. Prereq : BIOL 333 and CHEM 211, or permission of the instructor; Staff

BIOL 345 Gene Expression (1)
This course offers hands-on experience with current technologies in molecular biology. Gene expression is examined at the protein, RNA, and DNA levels. Students are expected to work in the lab in addition to the normally scheduled periods. Course enrollment is limited to allow students to sharpen their molecular biology lab skills. Prereq : BCHM 265, BIOL 332, BIOL 336, or BCHM 301; M.Jones-Rhoades;

BIOL 346 Developmental Biology Techniques (1)
This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in developmental biology. Students will use microscopy, micromanipulation, genetics and molecular biology to design their own experiments to examine the development of several animal and plant model systems. The course will be entirely laboratory based and will focus on the scientific reasoning skills necessary for successful experimental design and analysis. Prereq : BIOL 338 or permission of the instructor; J.Thorn;

BIOL 348 Teaching Assistant (1/2 or 1)
Prereq : Permission of instructor; Graded S/U; Staff

BIOL 380 Senior Research Seminar (1/2 or 1)
This course is required in order to fulfill the research requirement for the Biology major. In the seminar students will find a mentor whose interests and expertise match those of the student and cover topics related to the successful completion of the research project. This course is part of a two-term sequence. In the second course, students will undertake an original research project, either laboratory or library based (BIOL 381-384) culminating in both a written and oral presentation. Students undertaking an Honors project are exempt from the 380 course sequence. Prereq : senior standing or permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 381 Research: Populations (1/2 or 1)
Prereq : at least one course from BIOL 310-BIOL 319 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 382 Research: Organisms (1/2 or 1)
Prereq : at least one course from BIOL 320-BIOL 329 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 383 Research: Cells and Molecules (1/2 or 1)
Prereq : at least one course from BIOL 330-339 and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; Staff

BIOL 384 Research: Education (1/2 or 1)
Students who are completing K through 12 education credentials along with their biology major may elect to fulfill the research requirement for their biology major by undertaking a research project directly related to secondary education in biology. Typically this takes the form of designing innovative curricula. Prereq : BIOL 110, BIOL 120, BIOL 130, BIOL 210, one 300-level Biology course and permission of the instructor; May be repeated for a maximum of 1.0 credit; W; D.Beck; staff.;

BIOL 395 Special Topics (1/2 or 1)
Courses offered occasionally to students in special areas of Biology not covered in the usual curriculum.Staff

BIOL 400 Advanced Studies (1/2 or 1)
See College Honors Program. Staff

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