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Michael A. Schneider

Associate Dean for Faculty Development; Professor of History; Chair, Asian Studies Program; Co-Chair, Program in Integrated International Studies

Michael Schneider
Contact
309-341-7512
mschneid@knox.edu

Years at Knox: 1992 to present

Education
Ph.D., Modern Japanese and International History, 1996, University of Chicago.
M.A., Far East History, 1985, University of Chicago.
B.S., Chemistry, 1984, Michigan State University.

Teaching Interests
East Asian civilization, modern China, modern Japan, social life of food, culture and diplomacy in modern east Asia, approaches to international history, nationalisms.

Selected Professional Accomplishments

Honors/Grants
GLCA Endowment for the Study of Japan - Individual Travel Grant, 2009.
Association for Asian Studies Northeast Asia Council - Japanese Studies Travel Grant, 2009.
Japan Society for Promotion of Science Long Term Post-Doctoral Fellowship-Tokyo, Japan, 2000-2002.

Publications
Translations with Introductory essays: "Women Leaders and the China Incident: Inoue Hide, Ichikawa Fusae, and Takamure Itsue"; "Kôa - Raising Asia: Arao Sei and Inoue Masaji," and "Miyazaki Masayoshi: On the East Asian League, 1938" in Pan-Asianism - A Documentary History, 1860-2006, edited by Sven Saaler and Christopher W. A. Szpilman. Rowman and Littlefield , 2011.

Review Essay: "The Book Review in an Age of e-Politics." Journal of American-East Asian Relations 12.1-2 (Spring-Summer 2003): 117-120 (2008).

"'Were Women Pan-Asianists the Worst?': Internationalism and Pan-Asianism in the Careers of Inoue Hideko and Inoue Masaji." Pan-Asianism in Modern Japanese History: Colonialism, Regionalism, and Borders, Sven Saaler and Victor Koschmann [ed.], Routledge, pp. 115-129 (2007).

"Difficult to Teach -- and Learn -- the Lessons of War." Opinion/Editorial, Peoria Journal Star, 2006.

"Globalization and Historical Writing: Home Economics as Internationalism in Japan 1920-1940." Waseda Journal of Asian Studies 23 (December 2001): 79-101.

"The Limits of Cultural Rule: Internationalism and Identity in Japanese Responses to Korean Rice." Colonial Modernity in Korea, Eds. Gi-Wook Shin and Michael Robinson. Harvard University Asia Center, 1999.

"Colonial Policy Studies in a Period of Transition: Nitobe Inazô, Ôkawa Shûmei, and Tôgô Minoru at Takushoku University." Takushoku daigaku hyakunenshi kenkyû (Takushoku University History Review) 3 (October 1999): 1-28.

"The Intellectual Origins of Colonial Trusteeship in East Asia: Nitobe Inazô, Paul Reinsch and the End of Empire." The Asian American Review XVII.1 (Spring 1999): 1-49.

"The Limits of Cultural Rule: Rice and Colonial Development." Modernity, Domination and Identity in Colonial Korea: Beyond the Nationalist Narratives, 1999.

Presentations
"Technologies of Internationalism: Industry Standards, Food Science, and Foreign Policy in 1930s Japan," Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting, March 26, 2010.

"Thinking Gender Across the Pacific: Internationalist Women and Japanese Diplomacy," Presentation, Foundation for Pacific Quest, Association for Asian Stu-dies, Boston, Massachusetts, 2008.

"Finding Tanaka Makiko: Gender and Foreign Policy Discourse in Japan, 1920's-Present. Midwest Japan Seminar, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.

"Does Every Princess Need a Prince? Navigating Japan's Imperial Succession Debate." Japan in Transition Conference, Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin.

"Female Emperors and Foreign Policy: Japan's Debate Over Imperial Succession." Guest Lecturer and Public Presentation, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

"Gender and Colonialism in the Making of Japan's Middle Class Cosmopolitanism, 1918-1931." Association for Asian Studies, Washington, D.C., 1998.

Campus & Community Involvement
Co-director, Knox's Center for Global Studies.
Faculty Participant, QuickStart German, Berlin.
Resident Director, GLCA/ACM Japan Study, Waseda University, Tokyo.


What Students Say
"It is so evident in Mike Schneider's sense of humor and excitement as he jumps from table to table (to demonstrate an aspect of globalization) that he truly values educating his students by sharing with them what he has learned in the world. He challenges and inspires students with the unique perspective he brings to the classroom through his own travels and education in Japan. Professor Schneider teaches us to never rely on surface-level answers, but to always push ourselves and ask questions-so that we leave his class itching to talk and think more about what just exploded in class."
-Andrea Lutz, Integrated International Studies major

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