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Daniel Peterson

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Daniel Peterson
Contact
309-341-7108
dpeterso@knox.edu

General Interests
"My research interests are broadly focused on the successes and failures of human memory. In an effort to come to a more complete understanding of this construct, my research program explores both the theoretical and applied issues related to memory. From the theoretical perspective, much of my research focuses on how and why we remember (or forget) what we do. For example, I'm interested in how the retrieval of stored information affects subsequent retrieval, how stimulus repetition affects the likelihood of successful recall, and how motor information (i.e. one's own movement) is both encoded and retrieved. My applied research interests typically have an educational slant. This includes studies in which I'm investigating how self-testing can improve or disrupt memory and whether or not study medium (digital vs. paper presentations) can influence learning outcomes."

Years at Knox: 2011 to present

Education
Ph.D., Cognitive Psychology, 2011, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
M.A., Cognitive Psychology, 2009, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
B.A., Psychology, 2006, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Teaching Interests
Introduction to psychology, cognitive psychology, statistics, psychology & law, human memory

Selected Professional Accomplishments

Honors/Grants
The Students' Undergraduate Teaching Award (UNC‐CH), April 2010.
Future Faculty Fellowship (UNC‐CH), May 2009.
Graduate Research Consultant (UNC‐CH), fall 2008.

Publications
"The negative testing effect and multifactor account." Peterson, D. J., & Mulligan, N. W. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 39.4 (2013): 1287-1293.

"The Negative Repetition Effect." Mulligan, N. W., & Peterson, D. J. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition (2013).

"The Spacing Effect and Metacognitive Control." Mulligan, N. W., & Peterson, D. J. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition (2013).

"A negative effect of repetition in episodic memory." Peterson, D. J., & Mulligan, N. W. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 38.6 (2012): 1786-1791.

"Enactment and retrieval." Peterson, D. J., & Mulligan, N. W. Memory & Cognition 38.2 (2010): 233-243.

"Remember-Know and source memory instructions can qualitatively change old-new recognition accuracy: The modality-match effect in recognition memory." Mulligan, N. W., Besken, M., & Peterson, D. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 36.2 (2010): 558-566.

"Attention and implicit memory in the category-verification and lexical decision tasks." Mulligan, N. W., & Peterson, D. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 34.3 (2008):662-679.

"Assessing a retrieval account of the generation and perceptualinterference effects." Mulligan, N. W., & Peterson, D. Memory & Cognition 36.8 (2008): 1371-1382.

Presentations
"Does testing always improve memory? Theoretical and applied explorations." Paper presented to the Department of Psychological Sciences at the University of Missouri, 2013.

"The factors surrounding the negative repetition effect in free recall." Mulligan, N.W. & Peterson, D. Paper to be presented at the 53 Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012.

"How effortful is action memory processing?" Paper presented to the Cognitive Psychology program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2011.

"A negative repetition effect in human episodic memory." Peterson, D. & Mulligan, N.W. Paper presented at the 52nd annual Psychonomic Society Conference, Seattle, 2011.

"The negative testing effect and the item-specific vs. relational account." Peterson, D. & Mulligan, N.W. Poster presented at the 52nd annual Psychonomic Society Conference, Seattle, Washington, 2011.

"How effortful is action memory processing? Evidence from item-method directed forgetting." Peterson, D. & Mulligan, N.W. Paper presented at the 51st annual Psychonomic Society Conference, St. Louis, Missouri, 2010.

"Remember-Know and source memory instructions can qualitatively change old-new recognition accuracy: The modality-match effect in recognition memory." Mulligan, N.W., Besken, M., & Peterson, D. Paper presented at the 50th annual Psychonomic Society Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, 2009.

"Enactment and Retrieval." Peterson, D. & Mulligan, N.W. Poster Presented at the 2008 North Carolina Cognition Group Conference, Durham, North Carolina, 2009.


What Students Say
"Professor Peterson became the single most influential person in my life throughout the course of two terms. His teaching is efficient, highly organized, and he is able to cogently articulate complex theoretical concepts in a way that students can understand. He takes his job very seriously, and is exceptionally good at what he does. In addition to holding all of his students to the highest standards, he will always bend over backwards to meet with students outside of class. Through his mentorship, I discovered that my passion for cognition far outweighs any other discipline and have since shifted my intellectual pursuits."
-Zachary Lawrence, Music Major and Psychology Minor

"The way Daniel teaches makes already interesting material more exciting to learn about. His jokes and personal anecdotes make complex concepts more understandable, and he goes out of his way to make time for students who have questions or need additional help. Daniel challenges his students and is known for assigning tough exams, but those who put time and effort into his classes will have the most complete understanding possible of the material, as well as a great appreciation for it."
-Brynne Downum, Psychology Major and Philosophy Minor

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