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Faculty

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Office of Academic Affairs

2 East South Street

Galesburg, IL 61401-4999

309-341-7216

Fax: 309-341-7166

llbehling@​knox.edu

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Students display their countries flags at the annual International Fair in Ford Center for the Fine Arts.

For every professor at Knox, there are 12 students, our classes average 17 students, and our institutional ethos is that we're all capable of contributing to the project of moving the world forward. What does that mean for you? It means you will be heard; you will be seen; your professors will know your name, you'll know theirs, and that's just the start.

What comes next is this: Your professors will know you as a whole person, see you in shows or at the Gizmo or at a poetry reading. They'll invite you to join (or start) research projects, they'll encourage you to apply for fellowships or internships or study abroad, they'll help you think through (and create your own) options. They'll cook meals at their house and invite the entire class for dinner. They'll provide unusually thorough, thoughtful recommendations (because they know you so well) for graduate school and future employers. They'll be lifelong colleagues, friends, and sources of inspiration. Yes, they're that good; and yes, they matter that much.

Faculty Bookshelf

Our faculty are true scholar-teachers; in addition to making the classroom a forum for a shared pursuit of knowledge, they actively contribute scholarly works to their respective academic disciplines.

The following are recently published books authored by our scholar-teachers:

The Confessions of Frances Godwin
By Robert Hellenga, George Appleton Lawrence Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of English
Bloomsbury USA (2014)

The Confessions of Frances Godwin is a fictional memoir of a retired high school Latin teacher looking back on her life. Though Frances's journey takes her to Verona and Rome, she lives much of her life in Galesburg, attending Knox College and teaching at a Galesburg high school.

Into Africa, Being Black: New and Selected Poems
By Fred L. Hord, professor, Africana Studies
Third World Press (2013)

Fred Lee Hord's drive to explore issues of race, gender, and class is apparent in his fourth book of poetry, Into Africa, Being Black. The poems in this collection span 40 years, but are united by Hord's deep understanding of Black culture and the many issues, both internal and external, that define it.

A Brief History of Cryptology and Cryptographic Algorithms
By John Dooley, William and Marilyn Ingersoll Chair in Computer Science
Springer (2013)

A Brief History of Cryptology and Cryptographic Algorithms explores the historic relationship between the person who makes codes, a crytographer, and the person who breaks thoese codes, a cryptoanalyst. Dooley focuses on the increasingly complicated systems of encryption that have been created since the invention of the computer and the development of techniques to break these systems.

Lucy in the Mind of Lennon
By Tim Kasser, professor of psychology
Oxford University Press (2013)

The famous 1967 Beatles song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is described by Rolling Stone magazine as "Lennon's lavish dream." So who better to write about the meaning behind this Beatles song than a professor who not only teaches a class in which Lennon is one of the primary subjects, but has spent the last decade helping students understand their dreams?

Making Marriage: Husbands, Wives, and the American State in Dakota and Ojibwe Country
By Catherine J. Denial, Burkhardt Distinguished Chair in History
Minnesota Historical Society (2013)

Through the stories of married -- and divorcing -- men and women int he region now called Minnesota, Catherine Denial traces the uneven fortunes of American expansion in the early ninteenth century and the nation-shaping power of marital acts.

Tell Everyone I Said Hi
By Chad Simpson, associate professor of English
University of Iowa Press (2012)

The world of Tell Everyone I Said Hi is geographically small but far from provincial in its portrayal of emotionally complicated lives. These 18 stories by Chad Simpson roam the small-town playgrounds, blue-collar neighborhoods, and rural highways of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky to find people who've lost someone or something they love and have not yet found ways to move forward.

Students and volunteers stretch plastic to build high tunnels.
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Printed on Sunday, December 21, 2014